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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 7, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. violent clashes as world leaders gather for the 620 summit in hamburg. protests continued into the night. police used tear gas and water cannon to disperse hundreds of masked protestors throwing bottles and stones. president trump and president putin will hold their first face to face talks today when they meet at the summit. good morning, it's friday, seventh july. also this morning: mental health services in england at risk of being over—run. a warning from nhs trusts. this is one of me when ijoined the army. wow. 100 years of women at war. we'll hear how life has
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changed for those who serve in the armed forces. there are concerns that thousands of people could be let down when they buy a pre—paid funeral plan, with many not get what they think they're paying for. i'll have more later. in sport: johanna konta is now favourite for the wimbledon women's title. she plays on court one later. she is one of four britons for the first time in 20 years heading into the final week. good first time in 20 years heading into the finalweek. good morning. yesterday we hit 32.2 celsius. today won't be as hot with highs of about 28, it should be dry in wimbledon. there is some rain and showers in the forecast and i will tell you where when we are back later in the programme. mike, carol, thanks very much. good morning. first, our main story. there were violent clashes last night in hamburg ahead of the g20 summit.
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police used water cannon and pepper spray on masked protestors who hurled bottles and stones. the demonstrations came ahead of the highly anticipated first face—to—face talks today between president trump and president putin. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james robbins, reports from hamburg. a global summit automatically triggers protest from those who accuse the world's most powerful leaders of serving narrow interests. welcome to hell is one slogan, to meet the presidents and prime ministers who are divided over a huge range of issues. most eyes are focused on the controversial figure of president donald trump. the summit host angela merkel facing elections has shown her anger in the past over the president's denunciation over the paris climate change agreement. she now hopes to combine toughness with a search for some common ground. the real prize fight here will be mr trump's first presidential bout with russia's
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vladimir putin. 0n presidential bout with russia's vladimir putin. on his way here president trump acknowledged the possibility russia interviewed in the american elections, at the same time accusing russia of deliberate destabilisation through its actions in ukraine. these are charges denied by vladimir putin and the kremlin. the presidents may find some common ground but this very personal contest symbolises deep divisions among the wider leadership of the most powerful economies in the world. disputes over trade and how to co nfro nt world. disputes over trade and how to confront north korea are among other highly contentious issues. china, with russia, wants to keep the focus on dialogue. the prime minister theresa may has come to hamburg pledging to continue her campaign to outlaw the financing of violent extremism. she will present new ideas for international corporation to try to identify and close down even small—scale channelling of funds to learn attackers. all the summits throw division into sharp relief but still
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this one feels exceptional. we'll speak to the former uk ambassador to russia, sir tony brenton, at 7:10am this morning. mental health services in england are being overwhelmed by a combination of rising demand and staff shortages according to a survey by nhs providers. there are concerns extra government money designed to improve access for patients needing help is failing to reach frontline services. here is dominic hughes. two years ago alice victor was struggling with an eating disorder but her gp told her it would take at least a year before she was referred for nhs treatment. in the end alice went private but thinking back she remembers the weight as a dangerous time. it takes so much to come out and say i need help and i need professional help, and then cannot get it is horrible. and having to wait longer and longer, you get stuck in the same unhealthy thought patterns and your mental illness
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ta kes patterns and your mental illness takes over. a survey of bosses at mental health trusts across england paints a picture of services under pressure. 70% expect demand to increase this year. two out of three say they don't have enough staff to cope, particularly mental health nurses and psychiatrists. and 80% say extra government money intended for mental health is not reaching frontline services. we have seen many, frontline services. we have seen any frontline services. we have seen many, many more campaigns up and down the country talking about breaking down the stigma of presenting for mental health treatment at that means that demand is going through the roof. we are at risk of mental health trust being overwhelmed in the nearfuture. risk of mental health trust being overwhelmed in the near future. the department of health in england said it expected nhs bosses to make sure one extra billion pounds each year reach frontline mental health services by 2021. meanwhile a bbc radio 5 live investigation has found a 16% radio 5 live investigation has found
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a i6% rise in ambulance callouts to people suffering from suspected mental health problems, adding to the signs the pressure is building a across the system. a seniorjudge will lead the g re nfell tower a seniorjudge will lead the grenfell tower public enquiry has faced angry questions from the fire and local residents at a public meeting last night. sir martin moore—bick has been accused of ignoring calls for him to consider the social issues which affect public housing. 0ne resident accused him of doing a hatchetjob on the inquiry, which he has denied. tens of thousands of people will face financial hardship, and be forced into debt, if changes aren't made to the way the new welfare benefit, universal credit, is rolled out. that's according to the charity citizens advice, which is calling for improvements. however, ministers insist the benefit is working, as our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. at the citizens advice office in bridgewater, an increasing number of people are coming in, complaining about universal credit. vicki kelly has had to take the day
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off work to sort out her problems. she has no internet access at home and struggles to keep up with the online system. yeah, i'm having to take the day off from work to sort this out! they you want me to work and yet, you've got to take time off! what's it been like, then, the past few months? terrible. struggling for money, having to find other work just to manage. and obviously now, they have stopped it again at the moment, we have to make phone calls, make appointments to come back into thejob centre. and again, it is more time off of work, losing more money. universal credit has been rolled out across rolled out across britain, six welfare payments such as housing benefit and tax credits being combined into one monthly sum. but problems are emerging — a survey conducted by citizens advice of those people it's helped found over a third of claimants are waiting longer than the six weeks they should for a payment. one in ten people have to wait over ten weeks for universal credit. more than half have had to borrow money while waiting for their benefit. we are seeing at the moment
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thousands of people who are seriously worried about their personal situations and cannot fix it because the administration of universal credit is not helping them and the support is not there for them to see their way out of it. ministers insist that universal credit is a success and say most claimants are satisfied with the benefit and that help it is available for those with problems. michael buchanan, bbc news. a former manager of the car manufacturer audi has been charged in the united states for ordering staff to cheat emissions tests. the usjustice department accused giovanni pamio of conspiracy to defraud the united states and violating the clean air act. audi's parent company, volkswagen, has already admitted to cheating on vehicle emission tests in the us and fined nearly $3 billion. a gallery will open in david hockney‘s hometown of bradford today
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to coincide with his 80th birthday this week. the david hockney gallery, at cartwright hall, houses the largest public collection of his early artworks from bradford in the 19505. the display also includes family photos and previously unseen footage of him working in his studio. let's ta ke let's take a look at the papers this morning. shall we start with the sun? awarning morning. shall we start with the sun? a warning of a butter shortage. morning, sean. warnings brits face a biggest butter shortage — this would worry me, actually. a shortage by christmas, from the boss of a garage producer, shortage by christmas. why? quite a few reasons, there is a change in viewpoint about what is healthier, margarine or butter, mcdonald's have started using butter — they've got a lot of franchises around the world, haven't a? that's
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how they have created a little shortage —— they? how they have created a little shortage -- they? the great british bake 0ff has sparked a surge in cake making. that could be it as well. when was the last time you bake a cake? i made an egg custard around seven cake? i made an egg custard around seve n yea rs cake? i made an egg custard around seven years ago. laughter. that's not even a cake! well done. was it good? do you know what, it was good. who ate it? me. hold on, that's getting a little bit sad. primarily, i've always been a little fan of egg custard. laughter we are going on a little bit of attention. this is the fun of the telegraph, derailing wrecks it, in connection with comments from his nurse leaders about whether brexit policy should go at this stage —— brexit. and this is our lead story, donald trump on his visit to warsaw. today it is the 620 his visit to warsaw. today it is the gzo summit. more on that this
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morning. lots of stories on the fun of the times, france talking about banning diesel engines and petrol ca rs. banning diesel engines and petrol cars. the political story says one fifth of labour mps have appeared on a deselection hit list drawn up by left—wing activists, emboldened by jeremy corbyn's general election success , jeremy corbyn's general election success, so it is taking a look at that. and a beach ofjoe root hitting 184 not out on his first day as england captain. what have you got for us, sean? the big stories making the front pages. that petrol and diesel ban. there has been a real big move, you have tesla, electric car maker, announcing a mass—market car, slightly more affordable than the hundred grand ones. the day before yesterday, volvo said a electric only from 2019, and now france is banning them. it is a shift, isn't it? a big shift. when you dig into the pages,
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the one making the headlines, mike ashley, there is a court case going on between mike ashley and someone who wants money from him. some of the testimony from him, sports direct, he says "i am a power drinker, ijust binge to get drunk" and there is a story of him doing a deal ina and there is a story of him doing a deal in a pub, and does it mean it is legally binding or not? some of his comments about how he does his company, they have been quite big. some saying he hasn't done himself any favours in terms of public image of. he would say, this is me, this is the person i am. this is what he was like on breakfast. this is how i do my life. let me get on with it. 0n the subject of meetings and how people conduct themselves, there is fascination when donald trump meets another litre, literally that moment of the handshake. he has had one or two awkward ones. is it a handshake ora two awkward ones. is it a handshake
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or a squeeze? yesterday of course donald trump meeting, you can see it, angela merkel. here is the shot, who is doing what, who looks more awkward. it is kind of compelling. todayis awkward. it is kind of compelling. today is the day when president trump will meet president putin. today is the day when president trump will meet president putinm public. inevitably, not the most important part of these things. public. inevitably, not the most important part of these thingslj bet they planned it beforehand. sometimes these days it might be like that, like that... a bit of a chest bump, maybe. bill clinton would do the 2—handed thing. almost like a hand hug. that is a warm handshake, isn't it? we will see. thanks very much, sean. it's a busy day at wimbledon today with four british tennis players in action. mike's there for us this morning. good morning. you're taking a look at the papers yourself? yes, on my
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park bench, look, what a perfect morning. iam pinching myself. not only is it so beautiful, overlooking court 14, but do you remember we we re court 14, but do you remember we were worried about the fitness of johanna konta at andy murray and we we re johanna konta at andy murray and we were thinking "will they get to the first round" and here they are for the first time in 20 years, we have not too but four brits in action. it feels rather special, rather privileged to be here. you mentioned joe root but think about the fact this was his first match as captain and often that really affects a player's form. not at all. he is still going strong on 184. he turned around the match against south africa. england in a strong position. 375—5. the football news of the summer, lukaku looking good
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as he goes to manchester united, a p pa re ntly as he goes to manchester united, apparently snatching the star from the noses of his former club, chelsea. as for fab four friday, heather watson to reach the second week, up against azarenka, johanna konta against the greek, andy murray against fognini, and alea sped —— bedene against the shield will. and how about this for some lucky fans outside wimbledon. madaya was playing a little football volley. look at these skills from nadal. eventually he puts it into his head. that is a moment that young fan will never, ever forget. that
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that is a moment that young fan will never, everforget. thatjust shows how cool rafael nadal really is, back to his best, and keeping his cool is something we will all be trying to do. how on earth can we manage it, it is looking even hotter? no, you are wrong. it was very hot yesterday. 32.2 at heathrow. quite hot indeed. today we are looking at a lower temperatures, still hot and humid, but probably a maximum of about 27 or 28. so what is the forecast for wimbledon? it should stay dry. lots of sunshine, but through the course of the day we should see more cloud developing. sunny spells with a light winds. if you are coming down, don't forget to drink 20 of water, cover—up and have ra kes drink 20 of water, cover—up and have rakes in the shade. —— breaks. starting at nine o'clock in the south of england, there is lots of sunshine. blue skies over wimbledon,
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which carries on as we move further north, with bits and pieces of and there. as we head into scotland, a fair bit of rain around. through the day, that will sink southwards. in eastern scotland it could he quite heavy for a time. northern ireland has cloud producing some drizzle, and as we go across the irish sea into wales, a bright start to the day, and the same for the south—west of england. by nine o'clock temperatures will be rising quite nicely and that sunshine. moving from gloucestershire to the home counties, including southern counties and the midlands, a lot of dry weather to start the day. some sunshine with a wee bit of cloud around and temperatures continuing to climb. as we go through the day, the weather front producing rain in scotla nd the weather front producing rain in scotland sinks further south. the cloud will also build from the west. for most of us, we will be looking ata for most of us, we will be looking at a day of bright spells and sunny spells, not quite as hot as it was
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yesterday, but still hot, around 28 or 29. highs further north at 19 or maybe the low 20s. as we head into the evening and overnight, the weather front in scotland continues to move south. it will bring cloud and showery outbreaks with it. in sheltered areas it will be a cool night. temperatures in single figures. ahead of that we are looking at another hot and humid one, rather like we had last night. an oppressive and sticky feeling to the weather. so tomorrow we begin with the best of the sunshine across much of scotland and northern england, where it has been quite wet recently, and north—eastern england as well. we do have some showers around but has become further south again there is a better chance of seeing some drier conditions. later they will be a new front coming in across the far north. 0n they will be a new front coming in across the far north. on sunday that front will be sweeping steadily southwards. as it gets into southern areas it will turn showery, we could see heavy showers and the risk of
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some thunder. temperatures coming down more to a comfortable level, and behind that, again, bright spells with sunshine and 80 showers. so the weather, i think, is quite contrary. a bit of this and a bit of that. thank you, carol. will my leckey sits down on his bench at some point? there is enough room. —— will mike let you sit down? come on! i will move the papers. there we go. they are definitely relaxing now. thank you, guys. it's 06:19 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: 76 police officers have been hurt in clashes with protesters in hamburg ahead of the g20 summit. more rallies are expected later today. mental health services in england risk being overwhelmed by a combination of rising demand and staff shortages, a survey of nhs trusts suggests. 100 years ago today, women were allowed to join the armed
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forces in the uk. since then quite a lot has changed. women now serve on the front line in support roles such as medics, and bomb disposal experts. we arranged for a world war ii veteran to meet a new recruit to discuss their experiences of life in the british army. this is a picture of me when i joined the army. and this was me in italy. wow. so beautiful. ijoined the army when i was 19. what did you end up doing? they put me in the signals, the royal signals. 0n d—dayi 0n d—day i was on night duty and the girls came and work me up and said,
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come and have a look at all the fighters going over. it had just started. people often said to me, we re started. people often said to me, were you afraid? we were not afraid. there was too much going on. may i have a little of that. how do you feel you are treated as a woman in the army during the war?|j feel you are treated as a woman in the army during the war? i think we we re the army during the war? i think we were treated rather well. mind you, some of the barracks were ghastly, and sometimes the food was pretty grotty. this is barbara. lovely to see you all. any signals? royal signals? hello! what made you decide tojoin the army? signals? hello! what made you decide to join the army? the army was something i always wanted to do, it always intrigued me. i come from a health background, so i am going to be joining the royal army medical corps. that's me there, the little one in the middle. that's beautiful.
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we were introduced to trousers for the first time, when i went to italy. i was looking at your boots. very posh boots. how do you deal with conflict now? because girls, i understand, are allowed to shoot and kill? males and females do nothing different. it means that if and when the time does overcome that a female needs to pull the trigger in combat, she can have 100% confidence in her training that she has been given. exactly. how do you think you would have felt about that, maybe having to pull the trigger?|j have felt about that, maybe having to pull the trigger? i don't think i would have any trouble. like you girls, if it were me, i would rather know how to shoot a rifle, you know? because you have to move on. paul! paul! -- because you have to move on. paul! paul! —— pull! pull!. because you have to move on. paul! paul! -- pull! pull!. it is a wonderful life. i would paul! -- pull! pull!. it is a
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wonderful life. iwould recommend any young girl to have a go, even if you are unsure. can i give you a hug? of course! so nice to meet you. and you becky. it was a real delight. thank you to spending the time. that was barbara and becky there, and it was great to see their photos. you could see they connected, didn't you? barbara understood exactly what becky was going through, are still prepared to do all the things that becky gets to do now, which barbara perhaps didn't do. really interesting, hearing both of their reflections on the different experiences. in a funny kind of way, very similar experiences. if you have photos of your female relatives who are serving or have served in the armed forces, do send them into us the armed forces, do send them into us today. send them to bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk. we will be speaking a little bit more about women in the military a bit later on this morning. yes, celebrating 100 years of women in the army. we will be speaking to one of the women who has achieved the
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highest military ranks in britain, and the third woman in the raf to have this level of rank, a little bit later on. —— one of the highest military ranks. still to come this morning, our game, set, mug competition seems to have rattled some of the best tennis players in the world. see how britain's heather watson does in our challenge later on. they have all been very competitive. even new. —— even you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the family of a man from dartford who was stabbed to death in cyprus say they're devastated that the man suspected of killing him has been freed. estate agent george low, who was 22, was killed near a nightclub in ayia napa last august. suspect sali ahmet, who's 42, fled to the turkish—controlled north. he was arrested for an unrelated offence but then released without being charged. nearly half of homes given the green light in london over the last five years have not been completed according to the charity shelter. it claims the housebuilding system
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encourages developers to sit on land to keep prices high. it wants the government to hand over powers to councils to tax those who don't build fast enough. campaigners are calling for future london gay pride marches to be scaled down and taken back to their roots. the event started in 1972 and this weekend more than1 million people are expected to watch hundreds of different groups march through the capital. but some believe it's lost its way. scrap the commercial sponsorship. scrap the commercial sponsorship. scrap the commercial sponsorship. scrap the floats. scrap the onerous charges imposed by the city authorities. and have a march which isa authorities. and have a march which is a celebration and a party, but also a claim for equal human rights. a signal failure means there are severe delays on the district line eastbound between whitechapel to upminster and no hammersmith & city line between liverpool street to barking. in fact, it looks like district now
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has severe delays. now the good news is, trains are expected to run normally at paddington this morning, following last night's disruption. greater anglia trains in and out of liverpool street could be delayed though by a points failure. and a quick look at the a13 — traffic building up heading into town from rainham to dagenham let's have a check on the weather now, with lucy martin. good morning. yesterday we saw highs of 32, today we are looking at another hot day. if the heat is too much the yukon as we head into the weekend things will become cooler. plenty of brightness and sunny spells, just a risk of a shower, particularly as we move into sunday. a mild and bright start to the day, temperatures already in the upper teens. cloud gradually increasing through the day, plenty of rightness around. with light winds are temperatures will feel very warm, highs around 28 in central london. as we go through this evening and
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overnight will start to that cloud thickening. at points it could be thickening. at points it could be thick enough to produce outbreaks of showery rain. temperatures are not going to fall too far. we are looking at another muggy night with overnight lows of around 18. as we start the day tomorrow, a bit more in the way cloud around. again, it will be fairly muggy start, with one of two showery outbreaks of light rain and drizzle, but that cloud thinning and breaking to allow sunny spells in the afternoon. temperatures will be a maximum of around 23 or 24. so another warm day. i leave you with the outlook, as we move into the weekend. we will start to see temperatures dropping. 20 brightness around and one or two showers to look out for, particularly on saturday. —— plenty of brightness. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to naga and charlie. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. time is 6:27am.
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coming up on breakfast today: calls for more focus on mental health services. also this morning: love them or loathe them, self—service checkouts have been around for more than a decade. sean will be here to tell us what could replace them. thejumbojet the jumbo jet is 40 years old and will it be here to stay? we will find out later. and after 9am, we'll be talking about the gripping drama in the dark with lead actor myanna buring. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. the highly anticipated first face—to—face talks between president trump and president putin will take place today in hamburg. ahead of the meeting at the g20 summit, there were violent clashes. police used water cannon and pepper spray on masked protesters who hurled bottles and stones. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james robbins, reports from hamburg. a global summit automatically triggers protest from those who accuse the world's most powerful leaders of serving narrow interests. "welcome to hell," is one slogan,
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to meet the presidents and prime ministers who are divided over a huge range of issues. but most eyes are focused on the controversial figure of president donald trump. this summit host, germany's chancellor angela merkel, facing elections, has shown her anger in the past over the president's denunciation over the paris climate change agreement. but she's now hoping to combine toughness with a search for some common ground. the real prize fight here will be mr trump's first presidential bout with russia's vladimir putin. on his way here, president trump acknowledged the possibility russia interfered in the american elections, at the same time he accused russia of deliberate destabilisation through its actions in ukraine. these are charges denied by vladimir putin and the kremlin. the two presidents may find some common ground but this very personal contest symbolises deep divisions
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among the wider leadership of the most powerful economies in the world. disputes over trade and how to confront north korea are among other highly contentious issues. china, with russia, wants to keep the focus on dialogue. the prime minister, theresa may, has come to hamburg pledging to continue her campaign to outlaw the financing of violent extremism. she will present new ideas for international co—oporation to try to identify and close down even small—scale channelling of funds to lone attackers. all summits throw division into sharp relief but still this one feels exceptional. we'll speak to the former uk ambassador to russia, sir tony brenton, at 7:10am this morning. nhs trusts in england says core mental health services are being overwhelmed because of rapidly rising demand. a survey by nhs providers also found more than three quarters of mental health trusts think extra money pledged at national level
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isn't getting through. the department of health says there is a commitment to seeing mental health services improve. the seniorjudge who will lead the grenfell tower public inquiry has faced angry questions from survivors of the fire and local residents at a public meeting last night. sir martin moore—bick has been accused of ignoring calls for him to consider the social issues which affect public housing. 0ne resident accused him of doing a hatchetjob on the inquiry, which he has denied. citizens advice is calling on ministers to stop the roll out of the new welfare benefit, universal credit. the charity says problems with the benefit are forcing people into debt, and say tens of thousands of people will face financial hardship unless improvements are made. ministers insist the benefit is working. a former manager of the car manufacturer audi has been charged in the united states with ordering staff to cheat emissions tests. the usjustice department accused giovanni pamio of conspiracy to defraud the united states and violating the clean air act. audi's parent company, volkswagen,
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has already admitted to cheating on vehicle emission tests in the us and fined nearly $3 billion. a new gallery will open in david hockney‘s hometown of bradford today to coincide with his 80th birthday this week. the david hockney gallery, at cartwright hall, houses the largest public collection of his early artworks from bradford in the 19505. the display also includes family photos and previously unseen footage of him working in his studio. those are the main stories this morning. let's talk to mike, shall we. the sun, oh, yes it is, it is glorious, although hopefully not as hot as yesterday, because that was a real scorcher. yes, i'm comfortable. it is perfect at the moment, i would say, i don't know, 20 degrees, and it won't be as bad as yesterday, as
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we saw on the courts, del potro throwing water onto the crowd to help them. this is a perfect scene, isn't it, this time of day, on my balcony, like romeo and juliet. the cove rs a re balcony, like romeo and juliet. the covers are on and then in the distance the retractable roof being built on court number one. fabulous scenes as people get ready for a fantastic friday, especially for the brits. there is a huge day ahead here wimbledon with four british players on court aiming for a place in the fourth round. that hasn't happened in two decades. andy murray and aljaz bedene are both in action later but it's the women's draw that's getting really interesting. heather watson is first on centre court against former world number one victoria azarenka. that should be a fascinating contest. but the new favourite for the women's title isjohanna konta — she plays maria sakkari of greece.
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konta has moved into pole position after the eastbourne champion karolina pliskova was knocked out. obviously we can't write off the number one seed angelique kerber — last year's beaten finalist, you'll remember — who beat kirsten flipkens in two hard —fought sets yesterday. there were some extremely distressing scenes out on court 17 as the american player bethanie mattek—sands suffered a really nasty knee injury. sue barker explains what happened. bethanie mattek—sands of the united states lost the second set tiebreak. this is the fourth point of the final set. suffers a really horrible fall and immediately clutching her knee and shouting, help me. her team eventually come on to help her, along with her opponent. a medical tea m along with her opponent. a medical team was brought onto the court as well and was given oxygen. she has made her way back to the clubhouse.
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it obviously is a very serious knee injury. you could feel the pain when she was crying out "please, please help me, help me". we wish her a speedy recovery. kyle edmond did his best to make it five britons in round three but he is out. he said he "lacked a bit of maturity" in his first experience of centre court, after he lost in straight sets to gael monfils. first—time playing out there. it was a really good experience for me. i am sure a lot of players would say it is the most famous or biggest court in tennis. so, being british, growing up watching tennis and wimbledon, to get the chance to play out there is something you will a lwa ys out there is something you will always remember. the seven—time champion roger federer is still looking very good — he had a bit of a rocky start against dusan lajovic but still came through in straight sets. and another former champion,
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novak djokovic, only needed an hour and a half to beat adam pavlasek. djokovic said afterwards he was puzzled byjohn mcenroe's comments that he was the "tiger woods of tennis". away from the tennis, there was a remarkable first day in the job for the new england cricket captainjoe root. he hit an unbeaten 184 on the opening day of the first test against south africa at lord's, to rescue his side, who'd been in some trouble after losing early wickets. they'll resume on 357 for five. you are always proud of yourself when you get runs as a player. if you want to set the example as a player it is important that you score runs. it isjust player it is important that you score runs. it is just the start, it is only the first game. if i want to really push things on in the future than i am going to have to do it more consistently. the tour de france has been riddled with crashes
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but the riders managed to avoid a spectator‘s umbrella on stage six. it was won by sprinter marcel kittel but chris froome is still wearing the yellowjersey. we're told by senior sources at manchester united that they've agreed a fee of around 75 million pounds with everton for striker romelu lukaku. that is the big football news today. a move that has been confirmed is manchester city women's toni duggan, who's signed for barcelona. she is the first english player to join the spanish giants since gary lineker back in 1986. the british & irish lions captain sam warburton says he has unfinished business ahead of tomorrow's third and deciding test against new zealand. warburton missed the series decider in australia four years ago because of injury. for the last four years in the back of my mind i've had, you know, this tour, i have set my sights on this
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tour, i have set my sights on this tour, and! tour, i have set my sights on this tour, and i wanted to be in the test tea m tour, and i wanted to be in the test team to play the last game. it didn't happen and you just accept it. i was delighted when i heard my name read out for the third test and to potentially win it. it doesn't get much bigger, this time we will build up to that huge decider in new zealand. back here at wimbledon, what a big day for heather watson against victoria azarenka. she is the next to try as in game, set and mug challenge. today is the turn of heather watson. let's take a look. welcome, everybody to the bbc brea kfast welcome, everybody to the bbc breakfast summer tennis talent and this is game, set and mug. i am delighted to introduce the current wimbledon doubles champion heather watson. morning to you, heather. good morning. thank you for doing this. are you a little bit nervous? very nervous. have you had practice,
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any technique? couple of practice ru ns any technique? couple of practice runs and! any technique? couple of practice runs and i have some different techniques to try. great, well, let's see how you will go. i have my time on. you have 30 seconds. are you ready? yes. here we go, three, two, one. go. nearly. no. shot too far. you have got it right? no. we are ten seconds in and one ball has gone in. two also have gone in. just overshot with that one. 15 seconds gone. so, we havejust coming up to ten seconds remaining. just missed that one. keep going, come on. just overshot it a little bit. now this technique does not seem to be working for you, heather. three, two, one, time's up! no! let's see, come on. oh, no! shall we tell
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eve ryo ne come on. oh, no! shall we tell everyone at home how many you got? four. anyway... not that bad. good! in 30 seconds. no, it is in good. it is hard, isn't it? yeah. thank you for trying it for being a good sport. 0h, oh, you can see what it means to the players. don't let it put you off at all. it doesn't matter. you can follow the action on the bbc starting 11:30am. let's have a look at the litre —— leaderboard. i can't get over this in second place, charlie on seven? charlie on seven? surely at some point that is gonna have to be beaten and i am rubbing my hands in expectation that me and carol will step up to the challenge of. oh, brave words. even
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andy murray was impressed. challenge of. oh, brave words. even andy murray was impressedlj challenge of. oh, brave words. even andy murray was impressed. i know. yeah, i might have a go later and we will try with mo farah later on to see how he gets on. apparently he is really u p see how he gets on. apparently he is really up to it. look forward to it, thanks very much. you're watching big is the breakfast on bbc news. around 80 police officers have been hurt in clashes with protesters in hamburg ahead of the g20 summit. nhs trusts are warning that mental health services in england risk being over—run by rising demand and staff shortages. carol's at wimbledon with a look at this morning's weather. and of course the glorious atmosphere, carol, soon to be on as we have four brits kicking off, but will they be as hot as yesterday? not quite as hot as yesterday, naga. yesterday, heathrow reached 32.2
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celsius, so it was hot and humid. today the maximum temperatures are going to be 28, maybe 29, still pretty hot and it is also going to be humoured as well. in fact, yesterday of course play was stopped on court number three but because two spectators fainted. so, if you are coming down, in fact, out in the heat, take breaks, cover up, don't forget sunscreen and drink plenty of water. it sounds obvious but when you are having fun, especially on a court where you can't get out, it is worth having that in mind. the forecast for wimbledon today is a dry one. we are starting with some sunshine. through the day at bit more cloud will build, so we have bright or some intervals with temperatures up to 28 or 29 celsius, so hot and humid. temperatures up to 28 or 29 celsius, so hotand humid. for temperatures up to 28 or 29 celsius, so hot and humid. for most of us today, we are looking at a lot of dry weather. there is some rain around across the north of the country. if we start in the south where we are, blue skies and cloud
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building at the moment. it is pleasant. the temperature in london is 19 celsius. as we move to east anglia into northern england, a lot of dry weather. we have showers in the north. then into scotland we are looking at some rain. through the day some of the rain in the east of scotla nd day some of the rain in the east of scotland will be heavy but at the moment there is the odd heavy burst at it is moving through quickly. for northern ireland, you have cloud and drizzle this morning. equally, there will be some bright spells around. and then as we come across wales, some sunshine and bright spells. the same for south—west england. the temperature continuing to rise quite quickly in the morning sunshine. the same can be said from gloucestershire to the home counties and all areas south, so, for southern coastal counties. through the day the rain in scotland will push steadily southwards. and through the day too the cloud will build from the west, so it will be bright at times, all we have some
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intervals. we don't have wall—to—wall blue skies. temperature—wise up to about 28 or 29. if you are in the rain it will feel a bit fresher. we are looking at probably 18 into the low 20s. now, as we head through the evening and overnight, the weatherfront moves southwards, taking the band of cloud and showers with it as it does so. cloud and showers with it as it does so. behind it under clear skies in scotla nd so. behind it under clear skies in scotland and sheltered areas temperatures will dip into single figures. it will be much cooler for you. ahead of that band of cloud we have a hot and hubert knight especially in the south—east. tomorrow we start with a lot of sunshine —— hot and tomorrow we start with a lot of sunshine —— hotand humid tomorrow we start with a lot of sunshine —— hot and humid night. tomorrow we start with a lot of sunshine —— hotand humid night. we are also going to see more cloud developing in the west, so, wales, south—west england, low cloud and sea south—west england, low cloud and sea fog along the bristol channel and showers in the south—west. it should be dry in the south—east with some sunshine and temperatures into
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the mid to high 20s but not as high as today. and later on saturday at weather front and is as today. and later on saturday at weatherfront and is into as today. and later on saturday at weather front and is into the north—west scotland. on sunday, that thinks southwards across scotland and northern ireland. ahead of it for england and wales, as temperatures rise, we see some showers develop. some of those could be thundery and as we go through the day and the weather front moves south they will join forces. so day and the weather front moves south they willjoin forces. so the next few days, the weather is changing a bit and it is not going to be quite as hot as it has been. but charlie and naga, that doesn't mean we are reaching the next ice age by any stretch. well, i'm glad we've got that reassurance, carol! just tell me, yesterday, there were quite a few people in the crowd is really struggling. something like 60 people treated for heat related problems. something particular about the conditions affecting people? it was just a really hot, humid, sticky day. when you are inside the
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courts it is even hotter. you are sitting there, some sitting in direct sunlight, so you forget. when we go abroad you always room to put your sunscreen on. sometimes in this country we forget how hot it can get, and also how high the uv levels are. it isa are. it is a warning for people. keep yourself covered up. carroll, we will talk to you later. the thing is, you cannot have a big parasol, because you block the views of other people. you can have those hats you see people wearing. we are talking now about prepaid funerals. a p pa re ntly apparently about 1 million apparently about1 million people have these in place, but it is an industry that is not highly regulated, is that fair to say? that is very fairto regulated, is that fair to say? that is very fair to say. it has grown massively. we often talk about quickly growing industries in the financial world, with the not being on top of it, and this could be of
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those issues. good morning, everybody. 0verthe past decade, five times more people have prepaid funeral plans than before. more than 1 have prepaid funeral plans than before. more than1 million people now have them in place. the consumer group fairer finance has therefore decided to look into this, and flagged up some big bombs with the industry. they found evidence of high pressure sales tactics, including over the phone. they also found a lack of understanding from customers about what they were actually getting for their money, what type of funeral costs would be covered and what would still need to be paid for. all big problem is that he would have, if you have something like this in place, you would want it to be straightforward. so companies that are offering funeral plans are not regulated by law, like a lot of other financial products that you buy might be. if these companies go bust, you might not get your money back, or have your wishes carried out. so it is a complicated situation if it doesn't go to plan.
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and of all situations, you would wa nt and of all situations, you would want this to. let's talk to alison crake, national association of funeral directors. good morning. the situation is not ideal, is it? if you have paid the something and it does not materialise once you have passed away and your family has to deal with it. what kind of things you paying for? how do you pay for it? there are a number of prepaid plans on the market. some of them are very good. there are a number of options available. some of them will be of the instalment plan and some will be a lump sum plan. so, if once you have paid to that, you pay a monthly instalment, what then can go wrong once you get to the moment of your passing and your family has to deal with it? where are the problems? one of the things we ask people to look at very closely, when they are purchasing a plan, is to look at things such as third—party costs. third—party things such as third—party costs. third — party costs things such as third—party costs. third—party costs are often referred to as disbursements. those are things like burial fees or cremation
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fees which can be included in a plan. but —— some plans will make an allowa nce plan. but —— some plans will make an allowance towards those costs, sometimes it is a lump sum, and some will guarantee. that is a very important point and a very important question to ask if you are purchasing a plan. have you seen exa m ples purchasing a plan. have you seen examples where one of your members has been arranging a funeral which causes great stress to families, when they find out not everything is in place? one of the difficulties is that when people are purchasing a planet is very important to make sure is included within that plan. —— purchasing a plan. when plans have an element were a funeral director is named as a preferred or nominated funeral director, one of the complications is that if that funeral director did not know at the time that the plan was purchased that they lectured the nominated funeral director, what happens in that case, is that the funeral director is approached at the time of need and it is explained that a plan is in place. then the funeral director has to look at a plan. if
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those costs have not been covered or it is only a partial amount it can sometimes mean that the family have to pay an additional amount at the time of the funeral, which of course, you do not want to have battered additional distressing conversation with the family at the time of need. —— have that additional. and if one of these companies goes bust, you're not actually protected in a lot of cases, to either have your plans carried out or even get your money back. does they need to be more regular share in this area?” back. does they need to be more regular share in this area? i think so. regular share in this area? i think so. at the nft we would certainly encourage greater oversight of the funeral prepayment plans. —— at the nfd. we would certainly like that looked at closely. what we think is very important is that anybody considering purchasing a plan does ask those important questions about how their money is invested, what is included in the plan, it is very important to see what is included, and whether that is included in its totality, to make sure that it is
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guaranteed or whether it is a contribution, and to make sure that their chosen funeral director is actually informed and has an advance in place. do you think the regulators have been slow to keep up with this? what was it, more than five times over the last ten years, more than1 five times over the last ten years, more than 1 million five times over the last ten years, more than1 million people paying for a product? i think the time is right now. we have this report here which is very informative and i think now is the time for greater oversight of the funeral planning marketing general. because what is important is that the people purchasing these plans have the assurances they need to make sure that the plan that they have chosen is right for them, write to the family, and includes what they asked for. alison, thank you. alison craik from the national association of funeral directors. there you go, guys. a pretty big industry now. as it was mentioned in the report, it is competitive eia and people making accidental claims. this is another one where lots of smaller companies are starting to provide these things
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and it is hard to know if you have the right one. could i ask, i am just curious, the idea about a named funeral provider. if you have a plan with a named funeral provider, what is the point if they do not know? how does that work? well, this is one of the difficulties and one of the things we will ask them to look out. in our scenario, the things we will ask them to look out. in ourscenario, our the things we will ask them to look out. in our scenario, our ideal scenario, that would be if you purchase plan and you have a preferred funeral director or a named funeral director, that that funeral director is conducted within the cooling off period of the plan, and that that funeral direct them has the opportunity to say, yes, i agree to those terms of conditions andi agree to those terms of conditions and i accept that plan. that gives the additional reassurance to the purchase —— to the person that has purchased the plan that everything is in place. thank you. if you've flown long haul over the past 40 years, chances are you've been on a boeing 747 — best known as thejumbojet. it revolutionised air travel around the world, making it possible to fly further and for less money. but could the era of big jets be coming to an end? 0ur transport correspondent,
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richard westcott reports. 0ut out of the biggest hangar in the world can the world's gives the plane. it is the giant aeroplane that shrank the world. two and a half times bigger than anything else at the time. with its iconic romp, boeing's 747 brought cheap flying to the masses. it is nearly bankrupted the masses. it is nearly bankrupted the company, but ended up saving it. this is the aeroplane that gave wings to the world. because of its size, because of its range, and its economy. it made it possible for the airlines to fly economically anywhere in the world. but 50 years on, airlines prefer smaller, more fuel—efficient planes, and rowing says it may finally stop making the jumbojet. —— says it may finally stop making the jumbo jet. —— bolling says it may finally stop making the jumbojet. —— bolling says. ——
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boeing. but often all that hard work and all those miles, this is where 747s co m es and all those miles, this is where 747s comes required retirement. in less tha n 747s comes required retirement. in less than a day, an entirejumbojet has been reduced to that pile of rubble there. they are just smashing up rubble there. they are just smashing up the last piece of use large —— fuselage, and all that aluminium will be turned into beer cans. some of these things are going back to the airline, but others have been bought by private collectors, who will turn them into quirky office furniture. i can't get the film is working, though. they have slightly different plans for this jumbo jet. a very rich person has bought the top half of it and apparently he is going to turn it into some kind of social area. or office. and if we actually go into the cockpit, you have got all the controls, and a p pa re ntly have got all the controls, and apparently lots of enthusiasts from
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all over the world by this kind of stuff. 1970, and the very first 747 lands in britain. it made a big impression on one firm that day. there was a huge thing in the press about this first aeroplane coming in across the atlantic, pan am, and so i had to go and see it. it was a big cuddly aeroplane, it did its best to look after you. it goes for miles, it never runs out of fuel, the systems on it, the 400 series, which is the last one, they were modern systems common digital aeroplane, everything worked. what more could a pilot want? the jumbo is not the only giant plane struggling for orders at the moment. archrival is a bus make the even bigger a 380, but sales have been poor and they have
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also slashed production. —— archrivals airbus make the even bigger a380. but the jumbo jet is not finished yet. that knows comes up not finished yet. that knows comes up to carry freight. jumbo jets full of freight will be filling the skies for many years to come. i do enjoy seeing planes built. yes, and those sped up versions of the plane being destroyed a great. have you heard of flying ant day? the phenomenon's already caused chaos at wimbledon. we'll find out what it is and why it happens later on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. the family of a man from dartford who was stabbed to death in cyprus say they're devastated that the man suspected of killing him has been freed.
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estate agent george low, who was 22, was killed near a nightclub in ayia napa last august. suspect sali ahmet, who's 42, fled to the turkish—controlled north. he was arrested for an unrelated offence but then released without being charged. nearly half of homes given the green light in london over the last five years have not been completed according to the charity shelter. it claims the housebuilding system encourages developers to sit on land to keep prices high. it wants the government to hand over powers to councils to tax those who don't build fast enough. campaigners are calling for future london gay pride marches to be scaled down and taken back to their roots. the event started in 1972 and this weekend more than1 million people are expected to watch hundreds of different groups march through the capital. but some believe it's lost its way. scrap the commercial sponsorship. scrap the floats. scrap the onerous charges imposed by the city authorities.
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and have a march which is a celebration and a party, but also a claim for equal human rights. a signal failure means there are severe delays on the district line eastbound between whitechapel to upminster and no hammersmith & city line between liverpool street to barking. now the good news is, trains are expected to run normally at paddington this morning, following last night's disruption. greater anglia trains in and out of liverpool street could be delayed though by a points failure. and there has been an accident in central london on park lane, heading towards hyde park corner. there are queues forming from marble arch. let's have a check on the weather now, with lucy martin. good morning. yesterday we saw highs of 32, today we are looking at another hot day. if the heat is too much for you, as we head into the weekend things will become cooler. plenty of brightness and sunny spells, just a risk of a shower, particularly as we move into sunday. a mild and bright start to the day, temperatures already in the upper teens.
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cloud gradually increasing through the day, plenty of brightness around. with light winds our temperatures will feel very warm, highs around 28 in central london. as we go through this evening and overnight will start to that cloud thickening. at points it could be thick enough to produce outbreaks of showery rain. temperatures are not going to fall too far. we are looking at another muggy night with overnight lows of around 18. as we start the day tomorrow, a bit more in the way cloud around. again, it will be fairly muggy start, with one of two showery outbreaks of light rain and drizzle, but that cloud thinning and breaking to allow sunny spells in the afternoon. temperatures will be a maximum of around 23 or 24. so another warm day. i leave you with the outlook, as we move into the weekend. we will start to see temperatures dropping. plenty of brightness around and one or two showers to look out for, particularly on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though, it's back
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to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. violent clashes as world leaders gather for the g20 summit in hamburg. protests continued into the night. police used tear gas and water cannon to disperse hundreds of protestors. president trump and president putin will hold their first face—to—face talks today when they meet at the summit. good morning. it's friday, july 7. also this morning: mental health services in england at risk of being over—run. a warning from nhs trusts. this is one of me when ijoined the army. wow. 100 years of women at war. we'll hear how life has changed for those who serve in the armed forces.
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good morning. after rafa nadal‘s struggles with a self—service checkout at wimbledon this week, i'm looking at how technology has been advancing in what can sometimes be a frustrating finish to your shop. in sport, talking of wimbledon, johanna konta is now favourite for the wimbledon women's title. she plays on court 0ne later, and she is one of four british players are in action in round three for the first time in 20 years. long before our time, carol. quite right! today won't be as hot with highs of about 28, it should be dry in wimbledon. for the uk as a whole we have rain crossing scotland, more cloud and drizzle in the west but there will also be some sunshine and just a few showers. and i will have more detail
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on that later. we will see you then. thanks very much. good morning. first, our main story. there were violent clashes last the first talks between president trump and president putin will take place today. there were violent clashes last night in hamburg ahead of the g20 summit. police used water cannon and pepper spray on masked protestors who hurled bottles and stones. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james robbins, reports from hamburg. a global summit automatically triggers protest from those who accuse the world's most powerful leaders of serving narrow interests. "welcome to hell," is one slogan, to greet the presidents and prime ministers who are divided over a huge range of issues. but most eyes are focused on the controversial figure of president donald trump. this summit host, germany's chancellor angela merkel, facing elections, has shown her anger in the past over the president's denunciation over the paris climate change agreement. but she's now hoping to combine toughness with a search for some common ground.
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the real prize fight here will be mr trump's first presidential bout with russia's vladimir putin. on his way here, president trump acknowledged the possibility russia interfered in the american elections, at the same time he accused russia of deliberate destabilisation through its actions in ukraine. these are charges denied by vladimir putin and the kremlin. the two presidents may find some common ground but this very personal contest symbolises deep divisions among the wider leadership of the most powerful economies in the world. disputes over trade and how to confront north korea are among other highly contentious issues. china, with russia, wants to keep the focus on dialogue. the prime minister, theresa may, has come to hamburg pledging to continue her campaign to outlaw the financing of violent extremism. she will present new ideas for international co—oporation to try to identify and close down even small—scale channelling of funds to lone attackers. all summits throw division into sharp relief but still this
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one feels exceptional. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james robbins is in hamburg this morning. james, good to see you. so, this is all about, let's start, shalvey, first of all, on the first meeting in public between donald trump and president putin and how that will be displayed and how they will position themselves, what the election controversy interference, military positioning as well? yes, it is a hugely important prize fight, some have called it, and it is easy of course to trivialise these things but the fact is these dollman this isa but the fact is these dollman this is a contest between two very powerful individual personalities used, frankly, to the idea of settling things either by fighting
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mentally or even physically. many people see donald trump as a wrestler and president vladimir putin as thejudo wrestler and president vladimir putin as the judo champion that he is. they will be sizing each other up, ithink is. they will be sizing each other up, i think that is a really important part of the personality in politics — donald trump physically towers over the russian president, five foot seven against 6—foot two but president putin has years of foreign affairs experience, whereas donald trump has been in power less than six months. president putin has been at the top for 17 years. this isa been at the top for 17 years. this is a real contest of wills, of words, of body language, sizing each other up to see if they can find a way forward despite the enormous costs between them. ok, james, for the moment, thank you very much. in ten minutes we'll speak to a former uk ambassador to russia. just talking about how that meeting might go today. that's at 7:10am this morning. mental health services in england are being overwhelmed
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by a combination of rising demand and staff shortages according to a survey by nhs providers. there are concerns extra government money designed to improve access for patients needing help is failing to reach frontline services. here is dominic hughes. two years ago alice victor was struggling with an eating disorder but her gp told her it would take at least a year before she was referred for nhs treatment. in the end alice went private but, thinking back, she remembers the wait as a dangerous time. it takes so much to come out and say i need help and i need professional help, and then to not get it is horrible. and having to wait longer and longer, you get stuck in the same unhealthy thought patterns and your mental illness takes over. a survey of bosses at mental health trusts across england paints a picture of services under pressure. 70% expect demand to increase this year. two out of three trusts say
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they don't have enough staff to cope, particularly mental health nurses and psychiatrists. and 80% say extra government money intended for mental health is not reaching frontline services. we have seen many, many more campaigns up and down the country really talking about breaking down the stigma of presenting for mental health treatment, but that means that demand is going through the roof. and i think we are at risk of mental health trust being overwhelmed in the near future. the department of health in england said it expected nhs bosses to make sure an extra billion pounds each year reached frontline mental health services by 2021. meanwhile, a bbc radio 5 live investigation has found a 16% rise in ambulance callouts to people suffering from suspected mental health problems, adding to the signs the pressure is building a across the system. health problems, adding to the signs the pressure is building across the system. the seniorjudge who will lead the grenfell tower public inquiry has faced angry questions
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from survivors of the fire and local residents at a public meeting last night. sir martin moore—bick has been accused of ignoring calls for him to consider the social issues which affect public housing. 0ne resident accused him of doing a hatchetjob on the inquiry, which he has denied. citizens advice is calling on ministers to stop the roll out of the new welfare benefit, universal credit. the charity says problems with the benefit are forcing people into debt, and say tens of thousands of people will face financial hardship unless improvements are made. ministers insist the benefit is working. a us hospital is offering to ship an experimental drug to the uk to help treat terminally ill charlie gard. the hospital in new york also offered to admit the 11—month—old if legal hurdles can be cleared. charlie's parents are at the centre of a lengthy legal battle with doctors at london's great 0rmond street hospital, who say the treatment would not help the boy. a new gallery will open
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in david hockney‘s hometown of bradford today to coincide with his 80th birthday this week. the david hockney gallery, at cartwright hall, houses the largest public collection of his early artworks from bradford in the 19505. the display also includes family photos and previously un5een footage of him working in his studio. david dimbleby i5 david dimbleby is used to dealing with difficult situations on question time but he was left red—faced last night when his alarm on his mobile interrupted the programme to tell him it was time for bed. oh, no. the audience took it in very good spirits and started to laugh. he looked at his phone and turned it off. here it is. if we ever do brexit, they won't know what to argue about. the fact is, whether you've voted to leave all remain, it is not a win or lose situation. we are ata is not a win or lose situation. we are at a fork in the road and we opted for one fork. now we are in
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this situation. as it is time for bed. it is bedtime. laughter applause. this is my stopwatch saying it is bedtime. laughter carry on. i am glad he stayed awake for the rest of it. you know, it happens, doesn't it? it does, still, a little bit embarrassing, but he dealt with it in good humour, didn't he? from kennedy and khrushchev, to reagan and gorbachev, history between the united states and russia has been changeable for decades. since donald trump took charge of the white house earlier this year, questions have been growing about the future of that relationship. so what can we expect when the us president meets vladimir putin for the first time later today? greg dawson has been taking a look at dealings between the two leaders up to now. thank you for your time this morning. there is a danger of if you
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like trivialising this into body language and the atmosphere around the meeting but that is significant, isn't it, and just talk us through what that will be like? well, you're right, it is significant. this is the first time these men have met, though they have spoken on the phone. the aim of the meeting for them is to measure the other one and to put on a display for the other one. and they are very different people. mr trump is spontaneous, where is mr putin is not. i would expect britain to want to be co0l and correct and look for common ground. donald trump is hamstrung by investigation is going on in washington and cannot afford to be seen washington and cannot afford to be seen to be friendly with president putin at this stage. do they have to
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think it through in terms of the body language? i know that one of the men is much cooler. do they have to think about whether they are smiling too much. whether donald trump wants to look like he is being serious. these things matter, don't they? yes, they do. i mean, putin wa nts to they? yes, they do. i mean, putin wants to be on russian tv at home as trump's equal and will not want to be seen standing beside the much taller trump. he will smile in a courteous way but will also not want to appear to be warm with a country which has presented as being russia's deepest foe at the moment. trump, asi russia's deepest foe at the moment. trump, as i have said, is keen to establish a relationship with putin and has to demonstrate to watch as at home that he is not in russia's pocket, as he was accused of doing. so, watch for the handshake, watch for the body language, as you say, between them, whether they are close off our part. crucially, watch out
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for how long the meeting goes on. at the moment one hour, only half an hour with interpretation. if it is longer, then they have found something to talk about. what do you make of the fact that the briefings from the american diplomats suggest that going into the meeting, donald trump has not got a kind of fixed idea of the issues he wants to talk about — now, is it spin or is it believable he would walk in almost with an open mind, with an open brief as to what he wants to say? what is credible is that he is going in without having taken a lot of advice from the people around him. i think he has a clear idea in his own mind what his agenda is. it has been made pretty clear as he has become president he wants to find co—operation with russia on things like terrorism. rex tillerson, who has been with him, said they want to talk about cooperation on syria. there are a range of issues where,
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in donald trump's view, the us should work closely with russia and he will try to push that forward, i would guess. do you think they should be a requirement...” would guess. do you think they should be a requirement... i should also add. sorry. iwasjust should be a requirement... i should also add. sorry. i wasjust going to ask, trump betrays himself as a straight talker, he doesn't do the regular political thing. —— portrays. given what he set about russian interference in the us election, he said clearly that russia has been deliberately destabilising parts of the world. i mean, is he almost obliged because of the way he has betrayed himself to say something upfront to the president when they meet face—to—face? president when they meet face-to-face? yes, no, that is absolutely right, and trott position himself for this in his speech yesterday in poland when he referred to russian destabilisation in ukraine. he will want to say to tv cameras afterwards that he raised this issue with putin, so he will
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raise it. on the issue of russian interference in the election, he has been much more reticent. he never confirmed he believed it happen. i suspect that will not play a prominent role as a lot of people in washington hope that it will. sir tony brenton, thank you for your time. iam tony brenton, thank you for your time. i am just admiring the scene behind you. very calming despite all this fragile diplomacy that is going on. what a calming scene that is, the meadows in cambridge. it is a great place to be. isn't it lovely? thank you for your time this morning. it's 07:15 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. around 80 police officers have been hurt in clashes with protesters in hamburg ahead of the g20 summit. nhs trusts are warning that mental health services in england risk being over—run by rising demand and staff shortages. carol's at wimbledon with a look at this morning's weather. the sun is shining on a mac.
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carroll, what a glorious court that is. -- carroll, what a glorious court that is. —— carol. good morning. look at that, court number three. the court attendance of just took off the covers. number three. the court attendance ofjust took off the covers. this is where some people fainted yesterday, you can see how open it is. if you are coming to wimbledon anywhere outdoors, don't forget to drink plenty of water, put on your hat and your sunscreen, and get out of the sun when you can. now, if you are coming to wimbledon today, the forecast is a dry one. we are starting off with a lot of sunshine, the temperature climbing quickly now, but you will notice more cloud building through the day. so it will be bright and sunny through the day, rather than wall—to—wall blue skies. not as hot as yesterday but we are still looking at 28 or 29 as the afternoon maximum. for many of us today, it is going to be dry. there
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will be some sunshine but also rein in the forecast. especially across scotland. in southern england, we are off to a dry and right start. sunny spells already. as we move further north, again through east anglia and the midlands into northern england, we are still looking at a scenario. bits and pieces of cloud and also some sunshine, with rain crossing scotland. not particularly heavy at the moment. you may get the odd heavy bursts. cloudy and damp in northern ireland with drizzle. they will brighten up as well. wales, a fine start to the day. it is in pieces of cloud, especially close to the coast, with fog across parts of devon and cornwall, mainly coastal fog, that will burn away. from gloucestershire, heading towards the home counties and southern counties generally, we are off to a sunny start with the temperature rising quite rapidly. through the course of the day, that rain continues its journey across scotland. it will be heavyin journey across scotland. it will be heavy in eastern parts of scotland, especially north of edinburgh. and
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then for western parts of england, as that front approaches, the cloud will also build. away from that, it is going to be a fine day with some sunshine around. a few showers extending through parts of wales and into lincolnshire, but nothing like yesterday. as we head through the evening and overnight, our weather front continues to drift south, as it lands across parts of england and wales with a few showers in it. in rural areas behind it, wales with a few showers in it. in ruralareas behind it, in wales with a few showers in it. in rural areas behind it, in scotland, it will be chilly, with temperatures in single figures. ahead of it, especially in the south—east, it will be another hot and humid night, with temperatures falling below 18. as we head into tomorrow, scotland and northern england, in the north—east where it has been wet, seeing the lion's share of the sunshine. the rest of us will have that weather front producing a bit more cloud. in the west again, a bit more cloud. in the west again, a bit more cloud, and sea fog lapping up parts of the bristol channel coastline, and showers across the south—west. it should stay dry in the south—east. later in the day on
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saturday, a new weatherfront the south—east. later in the day on saturday, a new weather front comes in across northern scotland, and on sunday that will sink southwards across scotland and northern ireland. ahead of it, and dry and bright start with a few showers. some of those showers could be heavy and thundery and eventually the rain willjoin them. why then, temperatures not as high as they have been, or i going to be in some parts of the uk today. carol, there is going to be able to shortage. are you worried? no. i don't really eat butter. unless it is in chocolate, then i would be worried. would you eat one of sean's custard tarts? a p pa re ntly eat one of sean's custard tarts? apparently he is very good at baking them. i certainly would. apparently he is very good at baking them. icertainly would. i like anything sweet, it is my downfall. i didn't get these hips eating salad. aren't they worth it? you look fabulous. thanks, carroll. so, there is going to be a button shortage. and sean has declared himself king of the custard tart. this is really started something.
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good morning, france has announced plans to ban petrol and diesel cars from 2040 as part of a shift towards electric cars. the country plans to become carbon neutral by 2050. the move has put pressure on britain to follow suit. the food delivery firm deliveroo has said it will pay sickness and injury volvo has also announced similar plans about discontinuing the production of petrol and diesel driven cars. it will be interesting to see of other countries follow this lead. the food delivery firm deliveroo has said it will pay sickness and injury benefits to its 15,000 riders in the uk if the law is changed. the company says it cannot do it at the moment because it has to classify these curious are self—employed. a big report on what is called the geeky economy is due in the coming weeks, which could see
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major changes to the ways the likes of deliberate and the treat those who work for them. you could well be disappointed if you're looking forward to cream on your mince pies this christmas. that's because there could well be a shortage by then. the boss of arla which is one of the world's largest suppliers of dairy has said that prices have already doubled in some countries. the national farmers union says that talk of a shortage is scaremongering, but we have already seen scaremongering, but we have already seen prices go up lots in the past year when prices have gone up about butter. you have left a of time to worry about our basting. you have to start planning. some people start deciding their christmas plans already. i have to decide worrying going to be on christmas day this month. you are so popular, sean. 100 years ago today, women were allowed to join the armed forces in the uk. since then quite a lot has changed. women now serve on the front line in support roles such as medics, and bomb disposal experts. we arranged for a world war ii veteran to meet a new recruit to discuss their experiences of life
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in the british army. this is a picture of me when ijoined the army. and this was me in italy. wow, so beautiful. ijoined the army when i was 19. what did you end up doing? they put me in the signals, the royal signals. 0n d—day i was on night duty and the girls came and woke me up and said, "come and have a look at all the fighters going over." it had just started. people often said to me, were you afraid? we weren't afraid. there was too much going on. may i have a little of that? how do you feel you were treated
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as a woman in the army during the war? i think we were treated rather well. mind you, some of the barracks were ghastly, and sometimes the food was pretty grotty. this is barbara. lovely to see you all. any signals? royal signals? hello! what made you decide tojoin the army? the army was something i always wanted to do, it always intrigued me. i come from a health background, so i am going to be joining the royal army medical corps. that's me there, the little one in the middle. that's beautiful. we were introduced to trousers for the first time, when i went to italy. i was looking at your boots. very posh boots. how do you deal with conflict now? because girls, i understand, are allowed to shoot and kill? males and females do nothing different.
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it means that if and when the time does ever come that a female needs to pull the trigger in combat, she can have 100% confidence in hertraining that she has been given. exactly. how do you think you would have felt about that, maybe having to pull the trigger? i don't think i would have any trouble. like you girls, if it were me, i would rather know how to shoot a rifle, you know? because you have to move on. pull, pull! it's a wonderful life. i would recommend any young girl to have a go, even if you're unsure. can i give you a hug? of course! so nice to meet you. and you, becky. it was a real delight. thank you for spending the time. really interesting seeing the two of
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their meat and compare notes about what it was like then compare to now. “— what it was like then compare to now. —— the two of them compare notes. my favourite story today. people have been in touch with us, sending in photos of theirfemale relatives. the history of women in the armed forces. this is 0livia smith, in the raf. she works in aircraft maintenance. that has been sentin aircraft maintenance. that has been sent in by her proud mother elizabeth. this next picture, doria needham, who worked at an ammunition factory. she had her hands filmed for a propaganda films to help the war effort. she also drained —— trained as a driver with in this elizabeth. wendy sent in this photo of her and her friends when they served in cyprus 40 years ago. they still meet every year and redo the photo as the years go by. a lot of proud families getting in touch this morning. duncan sent in this picture of his 16—year—old daughterjessica.
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not yet in the army itself, but she has reached the rank of sergeant in the army cadets. you get a sense of just how proud people i would these pictures. this has been sent in by grace rutherford of her mother, nellie baker. nellie was in the women's royal are forced during the war. “— women's royal are forced during the war. —— royalair women's royal are forced during the war. —— royal air force. women's royal are forced during the war. -- royal air force. thank you to sharing your pictures. keep them coming in. if you have those, send them into the programme. the time is 7:26 a.m.. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the family of a man from dartford who was stabbed to death in cyprus say they're devastated that the man suspected of killing him has been freed. estate agent george low, who was 22, was killed near a nightclub in ayia napa last august. suspect sali ahmet, who's 42, fled to the turkish—controlled north. he was arrested for an unrelated offence but then released
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without being charged. nearly half of homes given the green light in london over the last five years have not been completed according to the charity shelter. it claims the housebuilding system encourages developers to sit on land to keep prices high. it wants the government to hand over powers to councils to tax those who don't build fast enough. it's london pride tomorrow. thousands will march through the capital's streets but some are questioning whether the event has lost its way. it began in 1972 as a protest for gay rights, but some feel it's now become too commercialised and bureaucratic. scrap the commercial sponsorship. scrap the floats. scrap the onerous charges imposed by the city authorities. and have a march which is a celebration and a party, but also a claim for equal human rights. 0n the tube, there's been a signal failure. the problems on the district line have now cleared up but there are still severe delays on the hammersmith and city line
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between liverpool street to barking. greater anglia trains in and out of liverpool street could be delayed though by a points failure. in central london, there's been an accident on park lane heading towards hyde park corner. there are queues from marble arch. and there are delays on the a4 out of town towards the hogarth roundabout. let's have a check on the weather now, with lucy martin. good morning. yesterday we saw highs of 32, today we are looking at another hot day. if the heat is too much the yukon as we head into the weekend things will become cooler. plenty of brightness and sunny spells, just a risk of a shower, particularly as we move into sunday. a mild and bright start to the day, temperatures already in the upper teens. cloud gradually increasing through the day, plenty of rightness around. with light winds are temperatures will feel very warm, highs around 28 in central london. as we go through this evening and overnight will start to that cloud thickening.
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at points it could be thick enough to produce outbreaks of showery rain. temperatures are not going to fall too far. we are looking at another muggy night with overnight lows of around 18. as we start the day tomorrow, a bit more in the way cloud around. again, it will be fairly muggy start, with one of two showery outbreaks of light rain and drizzle, but that cloud thinning and breaking to allow sunny spells in the afternoon. temperatures will be a maximum of around 23 or 24. so another warm day. i leave you with the outlook, as we move into the weekend. we will start to see temperatures dropping. plenty of brightness around and one or two showers to look out for, particularly on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. let's have a look at our main
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stories this morning. there were violent clashes last night in hamburg ahead of the g20 summit. police used water cannon and pepper spray on masked protestors who hurled bottles and stones. the demonstrations came ahead of the highly anticipated first face—to—face talks today between president trump and president putin. the summit itself is expected to be divisive as world leaders discuss a wide range of issues, including terrorism, climate change and north korea. yes, we can go now to some of the live pictures from hannah —— hamburg and this morning we have seen stand—off in the streets of hamburg — they are some distance away from the 620 — they are some distance away from the g20 summit itself but, as you can see at the moment peaceful protests taking place with a huge police presence and blockades in place. we have seen one or two
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burning vehicles this morning, burning vehicles this morning, burning out, but as you can see this morning, where the cameras are in front of these protesters they are relatively calm at present. of course, president trump to meet president putin a little later on today. nhs trusts in england says core mental health services are being overwhelmed because of rapidly rising demand. a survey by nhs providers also found more than three quarters of mental health trusts think extra money pledged at national level isn't getting through. the department of health says there is a commitment to seeing mental health services improve. the seniorjudge who will lead the grenfell tower public inquiry has faced angry questions from survivors of the fire and local residents at a public meeting last night. sir martin moore—bick has been accused of ignoring calls for him to consider the social issues which affect public housing. 0ne resident accused him of doing a hatchetjob on the inquiry, which he has denied. citizens advice is calling on ministers to stop the roll out
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of the new welfare benefit, universal credit. the charity says problems with the benefit are forcing people into debt, and say tens of thousands of people will face financial hardship unless improvements are made. ministers insist the benefit is working. a former manager of the car manufacturer audi has been charged in the united states with ordering staff to cheat emissions tests. the usjustice department accused giovanni pamio of conspiracy to defraud the united states and violating the clean air act. audi's parent company, volkswagen, has already admitted to cheating on vehicle emission tests in the us and fined nearly $3 billion. a new gallery will open in david hockney‘s hometown of bradford today to coincide with his 80th birthday this week. the david hockney gallery, at cartwright hall, houses the largest public collection of his early artworks from bradford in the 19505. the display also includes family photos and previously unseen footage of him working in his studio. we will have the weather in a few
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minutes with carroll but first let's go straight to wimbledon and mike is here for us. it is an exciting day for tennis, isn't it, here for us. it is an exciting day fortennis, isn't it, mike? and after an eventful day, yesterday, the weather caused some problems.- carol was saying, indeed, yes, good morning, so hot people were fainting but thankfully today it won't be as bad for 2000 people watching here. first up chi —— nishikori against agu. do you know when you made shadow puppets? we have had great fun making shadows in the past. in the middle, flapping her wings is carroll. you can stop now. laughter
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you can see it is getting cloudy because shadows are disappearing. anyway, technical staff. it is an unprecedented day for me at least because by this time of wimbledon you are normally focusing only on andy murray or one or two others. there is a huge day ahead here wimbledon with four british players on court aiming for a place in the fourth round. andy murray and aljaz bedene. women's straw is interesting. heather watson is first on centre court against former world number one victoria azarenka. —— draw. but the new favourite for the women's title isjohanna konta — she plays maria sakkari of greece. konta has moved into pole position after the eastbourne champion karolina pliskova was knocked out. obviously we can't write off the number one seed angelique kerber — last year's beaten finalist, you'll remember — who beat kirsten flipkens in two hard —fought sets yesterday. there were some extremely distressing scenes out on court 17
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as the american player bethanie mattek—sands suffered a really nasty knee injury. sue barker explains what happened. bethanie mattek—sands of the united states lost the second set tiebreak. this is the fourth point of the final set. suffers a really horrible fall and immediately clutching her knee and shouting, help me. her team eventually come on to help her, along with her opponent. a medical team was brought onto the court as well and was given oxygen. she has made her way back to the clubhouse. it obviously is a very serious knee injury. it was disturbing hearing her shout, "please, please help me, help me". we wish her a speedy recovery.
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kyle edmond did his best to make it five britons in round three but he is out. he said he "lacked a bit of maturity" in his first experience of centre court, after he lost in straight sets to gael monfils. first—time playing out there. it was a really good experience for me. i am sure a lot of players would say it is the most famous or biggest court in tennis. so, being british, growing up watching tennis and wimbledon, to get the chance to play out there is something you will always remember. the seven—time champion roger federer is still looking very looking very good. he had a bit of a rocky start against dusan lajovic but still came through in straight sets. and another former champion, novak djokovic, only needed an hour and a half to beat adam pavlasek. djokovic said afterwards he was puzzled byjohn mcenroe's comments that he was the "tiger woods of tennis". away from the tennis, there was a remarkable first day in the job for the new england cricket captainjoe root. he hit an unbeaten 184 on the opening day of the first test against south africa at lord's,
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to rescue his side, who'd been in some trouble after losing early wickets. they'll resume on 357 for five. you are always proud of yourself when you get runs as a player. if you want to set the example as a player it is important that you score runs. it is just the start, it is only the first game. if i want to really push things on in the future than i am going to have to do it more consistently. the tour de france has been riddled with crashes but the riders managed to avoid a spectator‘s umbrella on stage six. it was won by sprinter marcel kittel but chris froome is still wearing the yellow jersey. we're told by senior sources at manchester united that they've agreed a fee of around 75 million pounds with everton for striker
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romelu lukaku. a move that has been confirmed is manchester city women's toni duggan, who's signed for barcelona. she is the first english player to join the spanish giants since gary lineker back in 1986. the british & irish lions captain sam warburton says he has unfinished business ahead of tomorrow's third and deciding test against new zealand. warburton missed the series decider in australia four years ago because of injury. for the last four years in the back of my mind i've had, you know, this tour, i have set my sights on this tour, and i wanted to be in the test team to play the last game. it didn't happen and you just accept it. i was delighted when i heard my name read out for the third test and to potentially win it. yeah, this time tomorrow the buildup will be fever pitch. now, back at
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wimbledon, iam will be fever pitch. now, back at wimbledon, i am looking for signs from the universe as to who will win. it can come in all shapes and sizes, even perhaps in your brea kfast sizes, even perhaps in your breakfast here. this was tweeted by a federerfan, breakfast here. this was tweeted by a federer fan, i breakfast here. this was tweeted by a federerfan, ithink breakfast here. this was tweeted by a federerfan, i think we can say, he was served his toast with the face of federer appearing magically from the crusty bread. do you think it was made out of marmite? amazing! i will have to order some toast and see who's face appears later on. coverage on bbc two at 11:30am and centre court 5 live featuring heather watson from 1pm.” centre court 5 live featuring heather watson from 1pm. i like that toast. yes, well, it clearly wasn't by accident, was it? oh, wasn't it? someone tells me not. we will be back with the weather little later on. around a fifth of those caught up in traumatic events like the grenfell tower fire and manchester attack are expected by the nhs to seek professional psychological help. nhs england has written to gps
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across the country with practical advice to help patients who may be suffering ongoing mental health problems following a harrowing experience. we'rejoined now by dr ahmed kazmia, a gp whose surgery is just 800 metres from grenfell tower. and you've also, dr ahmed kazmia, treated victims, residents from g re nfell tower treated victims, residents from grenfell tower as well. can i first asked how they are doing, around ten or 11 people you have treated to a connected? yes, that's right, doing well, when you think about what they're going through. they have had a recent councillor and most have chosen not to see them again. they are busy with things like housing, finances, locating relatives. that is taking precedent at the moment. they are not usually able to come in to the surgery, so it has been home visits or telephone work. interesting that you say how busy
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they have been, and obviously of course they have, there are practical things to sort out. it coincides quite nicely with this open letter that has been sent by nhs england to gps talking about how to deal with mental health because it is six weeks now since the g re nfell tower it is six weeks now since the grenfell tower and it is at this time that we are being told that certain symptoms are easier to spot perhaps in mental health distress? yes, that's quite right. we are quite pleased to see this released because i think it formalises and draws a bit of media attention to something that is already happening and already happens on the ground at and already happens on the ground at a local level with doctors, nurses, psychologist, and highlights an important point, that almost eve ryo ne important point, that almost everyone who experiences a traumatic event, almost 100% of people, will have an acute stress reaction, so they will have symptoms of distress, panic, thinking about it constantly, and we see that in almost everyone. that is the minds way to process and reconcile what it was exposed
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to. after about six weeks we would expect that in about 70% — 90% symptoms would reduce to an extent they are able to live life normally, function and do dailyjobs but in a small proportion, 10% — 30%, which is the one fit statistic, sadly the reaction maintains and it is referred to as post— dramatic —— post—traumatic stress disorder. referred to as post— dramatic —— post-traumatic stress disorder. what would you do if you have a friend who has suffered a,, and also i suppose it depends on age as well — how can you recognise the problems someone how can you recognise the problems someone is going through and how to address that with them?” someone is going through and how to address that with them? i think there are two questions and one is what can friends and relatives do in the short—term. i think there is a lot of fear these days because we medicalise everything. i think people are reluctant to talk to friends or relatives because they are worried they are not trained
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professionals and might not say the right thing. i would encourage them to feel free to do that and encourage people affected to talk. there are things we know that if you do that the you are less likely to develop ptsd. try to go back to the normal routine, simple things like eating healthily, speaking to family and friends, making your needs known, even if family and friends don't say anything, they are just here to listen while your float your feeling, that is cathartic for people and something that is accessible to almost everyone. that is the first part. with regard to specialist care i would say anyone who has been berieved by a trauma, or who has had children involved, i think they need to seek medical assistance as well as the lifestyle advice that i have said —— bereaved. if someone still has these symptoms after four to six weeks we would probably refer them on to psychology. there is a very
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streamlined service for that now established very quickly after g re nfell tower, established very quickly after grenfell tower, so there is a number gps and patients can call themselves to access that. i would like to say one more thing about that. if you read some of the literature about this report, it says six weeks is the point at which we would start to consider psychology referral. i don't think that is quite true. if like i mentioned someone has been bereaved, a child was involved, they have pre—existing mental health problems and we know they are high risk of being one of the people who will develop ptsd, most doctors wouldn't wait six weeks to get involved, we would probably be involved, we would probably be involved more early. the six—week figure comes for people genuinely who are fit and well and don't have major mental health problems. those are the ones who if they come to us and they say they are having difficulty sleeping and keep remembering the event, they feel anxious all the time, that is when we try to reassure them and say that we try to reassure them and say that we understand that is how you feel, we understand that is how you feel, we understand that is how you feel, we understand you think it might go
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on for ever, and i can assure you that for most it will subside with time. dr ahmed kazmia, thank you very much and i understand you have a stand—up show in aid of grenfell tower victims and we wish you very well with that as well. it's 07:45 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. we were doing a serious interview earlier this morning, with tony renton, the former ambassador to russia, talking about the forthcoming meeting with president trump and vladimir putin. where is this going? well, the picture behind was cambridge. it was photo bombed. there was a cow in the background that photo bombed the interview with sir tony. a rather it uses cow. and we we re sir tony. a rather it uses cow. and we were going to go back to the cow. is that man hunting? -- punting. yes. anyway, we wanted to revisit the cow, but it has gone. was it a nice cow? a good—looking cow?
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the cow, but it has gone. was it a nice cow? a good-looking cow? that is the odd question of the day. you can have a handsome cow. look at that calm, lovely scenery. look at that. carol, how was it in london compare to that? it is fabulous year at wimbledon. we have been photo bombed by the court attendance, pulling the covers off in preparing the court. they are now taking a well—deserved break. not for long, they are very busy. if you have an allergy to pollen i want to tell you today that the levels are high or very high across northern ireland, lesbian and all of england and wales. for scotland, they are mostly moderate. —— northern ireland, lothian. in scotland, they are low. today will not be as hot as yesterday in london, but it is still going to be hot. we are looking at highs of 28 or 29. the forecast for wimbledon itself is dry. lots of sunshine this morning, but
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increasingly the sunshine will build, meaning we are looking at some bright and sunny skies of light winds. something to bear in mind if you are coming down. for most of us, a dry day. some rain in the forecast, mainly in the north. we begin the forecast at nine o'clock in the morning across southern england, and while we have a lot of dry weather around and it is the same for east anglia and also the midlands, heading north into northern england there is a fair bit of cloud and some sunny intervals. scotland, some showery outbreaks of rain turning heavy later. cloud across northern ireland, and a damp start to you, with diesel around. wales, bright and sunny intervals first thing. in south—west england there has been some fog, now tending to lift. as we drift further east from gloucestershire, through dorset, hampshire, through the home counties generally, and the southern counties of england, there is lots of dry weather. where we have the bra kes of dry weather. where we have the brakes in the cloud, literature will continue to climb quite quickly. ——
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the temperature will. we will see some of these showers developing across parts of wales, heading in the direction of lincolnshire, but nothing like we had yesterday. the weather front continue southwards. it will cloud over in the west and we could see some drizzle, but the south—east they in dry, hot and humid. fresh air elsewhere. through the evening and overnight, the weather front in scotland continues to move south, so we could see that feature producing cloud and showers. fresh behind it and chilean parts of scotla nd fresh behind it and chilean parts of scotland in the shelter of the loa ns, scotland in the shelter of the loans, for example, with figures in single figures. still quite warm and humid in the south—east. tomorrow, for scotland and northern england, it will be a lot of sunshine around. further south and west, there will be it more cloud around and a fuchsia hours and we will also see some coastal mist and fog coming up the bristol channel. later in the
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day on saturday a new front comes in across the far north of scotland and on sunday it starts to slip across the west of scotland and also northern ireland. england and wales, a finance dry start for you, but they will be showers developing through the day. through the day between shall meet. as the weather from sinks south it willjoin the shower was already in the south. that leads to a more changeable weather pattern on monday. carroll, thank you. —— carol. unexpected item in bagging area! sorry, naga was caught eating. are you calling this a bagging area?” could see the trap i was falling into. sean, would you like to rescue charlie? shall we carry on? there is a nice link, isn't there, from carol
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and the unexpected items in the bagging area. yes, the many options that charlie had and he chose that one. this is all about rafael nadal. well, not all about him. one. this is all about rafael nadal. well, not allabout him. he had one. this is all about rafael nadal. well, not all about him. he had some problems with this service. you may have seen that he needed a bit of help from nick robinson when using this service checkouts at wimbledon over the last week or so. it can be a familiar sight. rafael nadal said yesterday he was grateful for the help he got from nick. when you finish shopping there is always one somewhere, isn't there? an anguished shopper needing assistance. lots of us might think they can be frustrating, but after they can be frustrating, but after the us, the uk has the biggest market for this kind of technology. it's 15 years now since we first got them. recently tesco have changed the voice to make it less annoying, while morrisons even brought in 1,000 cashiers after customers complained about the machines. so what's the future for them? joining me now to discuss this is phil dorrell, who's a retail analyst at retail remedy and also worked in big stores like asda and safeway
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when this technology was coming in. yeah. have they been a success? from the retailers‘ perspective, absolutely. retailers want to reduce the amount of costs that they have in theirlabour the amount of costs that they have in their labourforce the amount of costs that they have in their labour force in stores. this provides a fantastic opportunity, instead of putting six cashier‘s on, you have one person looking after six checkouts, which is fantastic. great for the retailer, getting us to work for them. indeed. as it worked out better for the customer, i them. indeed. as it worked out betterfor the customer, i know them. indeed. as it worked out better for the customer, i know it looks quicker, but is it? it is quicker if you know exactly what you‘re doing, you are competent at doing it and you are experienced at doing it and you are experienced at doing it. if you have less than 12 items and they are all scattered all, absolutely it is the right thing to do. as long as those items do not contain products that other people need to verify, like alcohol. if you do it through that, you are used to doing it, scanning it, it is absolutely the quickest way to do
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it. the problem is that we get that dreaded "unexpected item in bagging area", where a red light comes on and somebody has to come help you and somebody has to come help you and we think or feel that we have been accused of something, and then a young lady comes over and authorises it. that is the problem. the technology has not moved on swiftly enough to match our needs. it has moved on a little bit. sometimes they are on scales, so there is no baggage area for there to be an unexpected item. is that the future that we are going to see? i don‘t think it has moved on as much as we would have expected to do. —— expected it. ithink much as we would have expected to do. —— expected it. i think the future of checkouts will be something more like is on go, where they are experimenting with a com pletely they are experimenting with a completely checkoutless store. —— amazon go. it recognises what you are picking up, you put it in your bag and you leave. i think that could be the future, that could
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happen in the uk in the next five yea rs. happen in the uk in the next five years. phil, thank you. so, that could be it. facial recognition could be it. facial recognition could spot that you have walked in, you pick up what you want, you walk out, job done. that will be very simple. thank you, sean. if you‘ve flown long haul over the past 40 years, chances are you‘ve been on a boeing 747, best known as the jumbo jet. it revolutionised air travel around the world, making it possible to fly further and for less money. but could the era of big jets be coming to an end? 0ur transport correspondent, richard westcott, reports. newsreel: out of the biggest hangar in the world came the world‘s biggest plane. it‘s the giant aeroplane that shrank the world — two and a half times bigger than anything else at the time. newsreel: even as a toy, the 747 is quite an armful. with its iconic hump, boeing‘s 747 brought cheap flying to the masses. it nearly bankrupted the company, but ended up saving it. this is the aeroplane that gave wings to the world. because of its size, because of its range, and its economy.
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it made it possible for the airlines to fly economically anywhere in the world. but 50 years on, airlines prefer smaller, more fuel—efficient planes, and boeing says it may finally stop making the jumbo jet. but after all that hard work and all those miles, this is where 7475 comes for a quiet retirement. in less than a day, an entirejumbo jet has been reduced to that pile of rubble there. they are just smashing up the last piece of fuselage, and all that aluminium will be taken off and turned into beer cans. some of these things are going back to the airline, but others have been bought by private collectors, who will turn them into quirky office furniture. i can‘t get the film is working, though. —— films working. they have slightly different plans for this jumbo jet. a very rich person has bought the top half of it and apparently
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they‘re going to turn it into some kind of social area, or office. and if we actually go into the cockpit, you‘ve got all the controls, and apparently lots of enthusiasts from all over the world buy this kind of stuff. 1970, and the very first 747 lands in britain. it made a big impression on one ogling fan that day. there was a huge thing in the press about this first aeroplane coming in across the atlantic, pan am, and so i had to go and see it. i'll i‘ll be it was a big cuddly aeroplane, it did its best to look after you. it goes for miles, it never runs out of fuel, the systems on it, the 400 series, which is the last one, they were modern systems — a digital aeroplane, everything worked. what more could a pilot want?
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the jumbo is not the only giant plane struggling for orders at the moment. archrivals airbus make the even bigger a380, but sales have been poor and they have also slashed production. but the jumbo jet isn‘t finished yet. that hump is there for a reason — the nose comes up to carry freight. its passenger days may be over, but jumbo jets full of stuff will be filling the skies for many years to come. fascinating to look back at the history of the jumbo jet, which we ta ke history of the jumbo jet, which we take the granted now. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the family of a man from dartford who was stabbed to death in cyprus say they‘re devastated that the man suspected of killing him
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has been freed. estate agent george low, who was 22, was killed near a nightclub in ayia napa last august. suspect sali ahmet, who‘s 42, fled to the turkish—controlled north. he was arrested for an unrelated offence but then released without being charged. nearly half of homes given the green light in london over the last five years have not been completed according to the charity shelter. it claims the housebuilding system encourages developers to sit on land to keep prices high. it wants the government to hand over powers to councils to tax those who don‘t build fast enough. campaigners are calling for future london gay pride marches to be scaled down and taken back to their roots. the event started in 1972 and this weekend more than1 million people are expected to watch hundreds of different groups march through the capital. but some believe it‘s lost its way. scrap the commercial sponsorship. scrap the floats.
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scrap the onerous charges imposed by the city authorities. and have a march which is a celebration and a party, but also a claim for equal human rights. a signal failure means there are severe delays on the district line eastbound between whitechapel to upminster and no hammersmith & city line between liverpool street to barking. in fact, it looks like district now has severe delays. the picadilly line has been suspended between north fields and all terminals of heathrow. and a quick look at the a13 — traffic building up heading into town from rainham to dagenham in central london there has been an accident on park lane, with queues between edgware road and marble arch. let‘s have a check on the weather now, with lucy martin. good morning. yesterday we saw highs of 32, today we are looking at another hot day. if the heat is too much for you, as we head into the weekend things will become cooler.
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plenty of brightness and sunny spells, just a risk of a shower, particularly as we move into sunday. a mild and bright start to the day, temperatures already in the upper teens. cloud gradually increasing through the day, plenty of brightness around. with light winds our temperatures will feel very warm, highs around 28 in central london. as we go through this evening and overnight will start to that cloud thickening. at points it could be thick enough to produce outbreaks of showery rain. temperatures are not going to fall too far. we are looking at another muggy night with overnight lows of around 18. as we start the day tomorrow, a bit more in the way of cloud around. again, it will be fairly muggy start, with one of two showery outbreaks of light rain and drizzle, but that cloud thinning and breaking to allow sunny spells in the afternoon. temperatures will be a maximum of around 23 or 24. so another warm day. i leave you with the outlook, as we move into the weekend. we will start to see temperatures dropping. plenty of brightness around and one or two showers to look out for, particularly on saturday.
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—— sunday. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. violent clashes as world leaders gather for the g20 summit in hamburg. protests continued into the night —police used water cannon and tear gas to disperse hundreds of protestors. president trump and president putin will hold their first face to face talks today when they meet at the summit. good morning, it‘s friday 7thjuly. mental health services in england at risk of being over—run. a warning from nhs trusts. this is one of me when ijoined the army. 100 years of women at war.
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we‘ll hear how life has changed for those who serve in the armed forces. france has said it‘s going to ban petrol and diesel cars by 2040. the latest move towards getting more electric cars on the roads. more on that shortly. in sport, johanna konta is now favourite for the wimbledon women‘s title — she plays on court 0ne later — as four british players are in action in round three for the first time in 20 years. when we were bairns. i wasn‘t born, actually! it should stay dry at wimbledon today. an increasing amount of cloud, though. still sunny, eyes of 28, 20 nine. for the uk as sunny, eyes of 28, 20 nine. for the ukasa sunny, eyes of 28, 20 nine. for the uk as a whole, rain in scotland. a few showers across northern england later, but nothing like yesterday. a lot of dry weather. still hot and humid in the south—east. we‘ll be
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back with more later in the programme. first, our main story. the highly anticipated first face—to—face talks between president trump and president putin will take place today in hamburg. ahead of the meeting at the g20 summit, there were violent clashes. police used water cannon and pepper spray on masked protesters who hurled bottles and stones. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james robbins, reports from hamburg. a global summit automatically triggers protest from those who accuse the world‘s most powerful leaders of serving narrow interests. "welcome to hell," is one slogan to greet the presidents and prime ministers who are divided over a huge range of issues. but most eyes are focused on the controversial figure of president donald trump. this summit host, germany‘s chancellor angela merkel, facing elections, has showed her anger in the past over the president‘s denunciation of the paris climate change agreement. but she‘s now hoping to combine toughness with a search
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for some common ground. the real prize fight here will be mr trump‘s first presidential bout with russia‘s vladimir putin. on his way here, president trump acknowledged the possibility russia interfered in the american elections, at the same time he accused russia of deliberate destabilisation through its actions in ukraine. these are charges denied by vladimir putin and the kremlin. the two presidents may find some common ground but this very personal contest symbolises deep divisions among the wider leadership of the most powerful economies in the world. disputes over trade and how to confront north korea are among other highly contentious issues. china, with russia, wants to keep the focus on dialogue. the prime minister, theresa may, has come to hamburg pledging to continue her campaign to outlaw the financing of violent extremism. she will present new ideas for international co—oporation to try to identify and close down even small—scale channelling of funds to lone attackers.
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all summits throw division into sharp relief but still this one feels exceptional. well those demonstrations have continued in to this morning. police and protesters have clashed again. later on this morning it‘s expected children and teenagers will march in hamburg. and we‘ll get the latest from our diplomatic correspondent who‘s in hamburg in about 15 minutes. mental health services in england are being overwhelmed by a combination of rising demand and staff shortages — according to a survey by nhs providers. there are also concerns that extra government money, designed to improve access for patients needing help, is failing to reach front line services. here‘s our health correspondent, dominic hughes. two years ago alice victor was struggling with an eating disorder but her gp told her it would take at least a year before she was referred for nhs treatment. in the end alice went private but, thinking back, she remembers that
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wait as a dangerous time. it takes so much to come out and say i need help and i need professional help, and then to not get it is horrible. and having to wait longer and longer, you get stuck in the same unhealthy thought patterns and your mental illness takes over. a survey of bosses at mental health trusts across england paints a picture of services under pressure. 70% expect demand to increase this year. two out of three trusts say they don‘t have enough staff to cope, particularly mental health nurses and psychiatrists. and 80% say extra government money intended for mental health is not reaching frontline services. we have seen many, many more campaigns up and down the country really talking about breaking down the stigma of presenting for mental health treatment, but that means that demand is going through the roof. and i think we are at risk of mental health trusts being overwhelmed in the near future. the department of health in england said it expected nhs bosses to make
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sure an extra billion pounds each year reached frontline mental health services by 2021. meanwhile, a bbc radio 5 live investigation has found a 16% rise in ambulance callouts to people suffering from suspected mental health problems, adding to the signs the pressure is building across the system. the seniorjudge who will lead the grenfell tower public inquiry has faced angry questions from survivors of the fire and local residents at a public meeting last night. sir martin moore—bick has been accused of ignoring calls for him to consider the social issues which affect public housing. 0ne resident accused him of doing a hatchetjob on the inquiry — which he has denied. citizens advice is calling on ministers to stop the roll out of the new welfare benefit, universal credit. the charity says problems with the benefit are forcing people into debt, and say tens of thousands of people will face financial hardship
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unless improvements are made. ministers insist the benefit is working. a new gallery will open in david hockney‘s hometown of bradford today — to coincide with his 80th birthday this week. the david hockney gallery, at cartwright hall, houses the largest public collection of his early artworks from bradford in the 19505. the display also includes family photos and previously unseen footage of him working in his studio. i like stories like this! david dimbleby is used to dealing with difficult situations as the host of question time, but he was left a little red—faced last night when his alarm on his mobile interrupted the programme to tell him it was ‘time for bed‘. the audience started laughing as dimbleby looked at his phone and turned the alarm off. let‘s take a look. if we ever do brexit they will know
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what to argue about at their dinner parties, will they? what to argue about at their dinner parties, willthey? brexit, what to argue about at their dinner parties, will they? brexit, whether you voted leave all remain was not a win or lose situation. you put a fork in the road and we opted for one fork. now we're in this situation, we're all going down that forked... it's bedtime! this is my stopwatch saying it‘s bedtime. carry on. it sometimes happens. it does. the rule is, switch the phone off. don‘t even have it in the studio. never mind. eight minutes past eight. a day of great sport to head forfour eight. a day of great sport to head for four brits taking to the court today. the third round and for the first time in 20 years we four brits. mike is at wimbledon for us this morning. it‘s going to be a cracking day for british interests in wimbledon. incredible, first-time
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for 20 years as you say. it could get even better if three of the four make it through, that hasn‘t happened, that three brits have made it to the last 16, since 1979. someone who knows all about history, annabel croft, you know about setting records because when you we re setting records because when you were 15 you were the youngest brit in 95 years to play at wimbledon. long time ago, i can tell you. but strictly on centre court today, what is weird on this first friday, all the focus and talk isn‘t about andy murray, like it has been in recent yea rs. murray, like it has been in recent years. that is very true, normally so years. that is very true, normally so focused on him, from quite early on in the tournament, because he's the last man standing. this year we've had a lot of success with the brits. they've been doing well, haven't they, through the course of the year. aljaz bedene has had a great year. heather watson has ignited on the grass court. johanna
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konta, what a wonderful year she's had, she's won a couple of big tour titles and started to get tennis motoring towards wimbledon. that injury talk of a week ago when we doubted if murray and konta would get past the first round because of injury, that is gone and konta is favourite. it's extraordinary. my pick was pliskova, she went out to another tricky grass court specialist. konta hard a tricky opening couple of matches to two players she'd lost it in the last month. the fact she's got a really difficult match, and you have to rememberto win difficult match, and you have to remember to win these championships you have to win seven matches over two weeks, there is always going to bea two weeks, there is always going to be a rocky road. i feel that one is out of the way. she got through the match with vekic and i feel things will open up for her. i haven‘t heard much about her opponent today. an unknown quantity.
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she's a young talented player coming through. she has a lot of power on the court, a lot of skills. she's the court, a lot of skills. she's the daughter of a tour player i was on tour with so it's nice to see her doing so well. i don't think she's going to have enough experience and i thinkjohanna going to have enough experience and i think johanna konta, going to have enough experience and ithinkjohanna konta, the going to have enough experience and i thinkjohanna konta, the tennis she brings onto the court, with the aggression, great service, great returns and great athletic ability will be too much. it's wonderful for heather watson, who‘s been in the of johanna konta to have centre court billing against a former world number one. victoria azarenka. the stage is set for heather watson to make her mark. it really is, she also wants to set aside what happened when she played serena williams here, she came within two point of a win and it took a quite a long time to get over that match. heather watson makes a big stage, she says it's her favourite court in the world. she is former world numberone, new mum, hasn't the world. she is former world number one, new mum, hasn't played a lot of tennis. they've met each other four times. azarenka...
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heather hasn't got past four games ina set heather hasn't got past four games in a set against her. the other matches have been significantly easy. today might be different with the form heather is playing. aljaz bedene against gilles muller. any chance he can get past? e is the underdog. he is the underdog, he's had two quite long matches, but he's played well to get through. he's had a run of wins, a lot more confident in his game in 2017. gilles muller isa in his game in 2017. gilles muller is a little bit of a nightmare for everyone , is a little bit of a nightmare for everyone, he's a bit like greg rusedski was, that lefty serve, huge serve on rusedski was, that lefty serve, huge serve on a grass court rusedski was, that lefty serve, huge serve on a grass court that swings out wide. he's had a huge amount of success on the grass courts. it had his first couple of titles on tour. so he's extremely confident and did well at queens. he'll be a tough one. weirdly the most difficult match is against andy murray. fabio fognini, head—to—head they‘ve won
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three each, all on clay. for panini beat him earlier this year. —— fabio fognini beat him earlier this year. i call him the johnny depp of tennis and he's like a swashbuckling pirate and he's like a swashbuckling pirate and he's like a swashbuckling pirate and he needs a grander stage. he's one of these players that all the other top players love to practice with because they are in awe of the tale nt with because they are in awe of the talent and skills he possesses. he has amazing shotmaking capabilities, this firepower that can bring a crowd to their feet with breathtaking or shotmaking. interspersed with beautiful, soft hands and silky skills with drop shots. we'll see a lot of drop shots. we'll see a lot of drop shots. fascinating it is the first time on grass, i'm not sure how his skills will transfer onto the grass, it'll be interesting. i think there isa it'll be interesting. i think there is a lot of respect for andy murray on the other end of the court. they‘ve been friends are known each other since they were 12. i‘m commentating on the murray match and i‘m really looking forward to it. it's i‘m really looking forward to it. it‘s much harder in here than it has been on the outside courts. carol is
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here. it‘s not going to be as bad today. not as hot as yesterday, still hot and humid, maximum temperatures 28 or 29 celsius. you can see the roof nicely behind us on ce ntre can see the roof nicely behind us on centre court, it takes about ten minutes to close. it weighs 3000 tonnes. the sun is beating down, the temperature is 20 celsius at the moment and the forecast for wimbledon today is a dry one. increasing amount of cloud developing through the day. not going to be a cloudy day, it'll be bright or sunny. those temperatures getting up to a sticky 29. for many of us today it would be dry, sunny intervals. some rain across the north of the country. especially across scotland. we start the hmmfi across scotland. we start the forecast in the south. a lot of sunshine first thing across the south—east. a little bit of cloud bubbling up, not spoiling it at all, temperatures rising rapidly. the same across east anglia come to the midlands, and heading into northern
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england. for scotland we have some showery outbreaks of rain this morning, it'll be pushing south east through the course of the day. for northern ireland quite a cloudy start for you, and a damp one. some drizzle around. it will brighten up later on for wales, drizzle around. it will brighten up later on forwales, similar drizzle around. it will brighten up later on for wales, similar story, temperatures rising quickly in the sunshine. a wee bit more cloud around the coast, as we have across parts of devon and cornwall. a lot of that will break. again, we're looking at sunny spells. they continue from gloucestershire through dorset, hampshire, in and across the south midlands, over towards the home counties. temperatures containing to rise up to about 22 celsius. through the day the rain in scotland thinks southwards. it'll be heavy in eastern scotland, north of edinburgh. at the same time it'll brighten up in northern ireland. as things consult it'll cloud over western parts of england and wales a little drizzle. — — western parts of england and wales a little drizzle. —— as things it's fresher outside the south—east.
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the weather front continues to sink into england and wales as a weak feature producing a band of cloud and the odd shower. it'll be chilly in the shelter in scotland. ahead it'll be a humid night in the south—east. tomorrow for scotland and northern ireland, quite a different start of the day. the same for northern england. there will be more sunshine around. we'll have the weak weather front producing a line of cloud. and we'll see some sea fog lap onshore across the bristol channel, too. we have more cloud across western areas but the south—east again should stay dry. temperatures down a notch on today but still fairly pleasant if you are out and about. fresher for the rest of the uk. 0n out and about. fresher for the rest of the uk. on saturday a weather front comes in across the far north of scotland, sinking south across scotland and northern ireland during the course of sunday. ahead of it for england and wales we are looking at some sunshine. we'll see showers
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sparked off as temperatures rise. some of those could be heavy and thundery. eventually rain will come south. i have a quick question for you, we've been talking about centre court, how many tennis balls do you think, with the roof closed, it would take to fill centre court? the i can‘t think of a number that big, 2 million, 4 million? not even close. 290 million. i can't even imagine it. how do you know that, carol? you did it all in your head, you are very clever! i wish that i could say that! thank you very much. it‘s 8:17 and you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. around 80 police officers have been hurt in clashes with protesters in hamburg ahead of the g20 summit.
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nhs trusts are warning that mental health services in england risk being over—run by rising demand and staff shortages. let‘s go back to our main story and the clashes between police and protesters in hamburg which started last night and have continued in to this morning. these are the latest pictures from the demonstrations this morning. cars have been burnt out ahead of the g20 summit where later today president putin and president trump will meet face—to—face for the first time. that meeting is what many people will be focusing on although there are other issues to discuss, north korea, to have arisen with a fair amount of friction between various leaders attending. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james robbins is in hamburg this morning. james, there is a lot to cover, we
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have shown those pictures but i suppose it is about the handshakes we are about to see and the messages that we are about to hear.” we are about to see and the messages that we are about to hear. i think that‘s right. this is an unusually fractious both outside with those protests a nd fractious both outside with those protests and inside the summit centre where there is a real sense among many of the leaders, theyjust do not know which way the world is headed, and to that extent, the crunch first meeting between the two presidents, the president of russia and the president of the united states, crystallises that uncertainty. these are two leaders who will undoubtedly size each other up who will undoubtedly size each other up physically as well as politically. it has been called something of a prize fight and that is not trivialising it. this is a big clash between president trump uzis and of as something of a wrestler and uzis and of as something of a wrestler a nd wa nts uzis and of as something of a wrestler and wants to win and president putin, who is much shorter, perhaps seven inches shorter, perhaps seven inches shorter, trump will tower over him
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that he thinks he can rely on his judo training and his long political experience... james, i just want to explain what our viewers can see. you are talking about the meeting between the president is today. we are showing pictures of the protesters targeted by police with water cannons on the streets of hamburg. this is happening on the streets. it‘s not an uncommon thing to see protesters outside these g8 20 all g7 summits, is it. frankly, it has become traditional for an entire coalition of protesters, some determined anarchists who i think have been behind the violence, who came this morning frankly looking for trouble, others in the crowd who are frankly appalled by that and feel they have real political grievances, some of them are green voters in a country, germany, that sees itself as particularly green. some are suspicious of what they
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think are private stitch ups behind closed doors between an representative leaders of the largest economies. an uneasy coalition, no question that angela merkel took a real risk deciding to bring this summit to the major city of hamburg. i think she knew that some of those scenes would be played out so she hoped and believed that they could be contained and she helps the violence will be contained because this is an election year for her. she wanted to project the image ofa her. she wanted to project the image of a strong leader prepared to champion the values of democracy including the freedom to protest. yet it is a high—risk strategy if it goes wrong. apologies for interrupting you, thank you for explaining that. of course many meetings and as james said a fractious environment. just to update you with what you are seeing, protesters sitting down facing off against police, they have been targeted with water cannon as well. james explaining, protesters at these summits are not uncommon,
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angela merkel also concerned about making sure she is portraying a strong image especially when it comes to security with all these international leaders in hamburg. we will keep you up—to—date with any developments in hamburg as it happens. now time for the business news. good morning, france has announced plans to ban petrol and diesel cars from 2040 as part of a shift towards electric cars. it‘s been a big week for the industry, with tesla launching a mass—market electric car for around £30,000 and volvo saying all its new cars will be electric or hybrid from 2019. it will be interesting to see if british rules for petrol and diesel cars will change at all. the food delivery firm deliveroo has said it will pay sickness and injury benefits to its 15,000 riders in the uk, if the law is changed. it is a big if.
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the company says it can‘t do that at the moment, because it has to classify its couriers as self—employed. a big report on what‘s called the gig economy is due within the coming weeks, which could see major changes to the way the likes of deliveroo and uber treat those that work for them. and you could have a bit of bother with your basting this christmas. the boss of one of the world‘s largest suppliers of dairy has said there is set to be a shortage of butter by the end of the year — as more of us move away from other spreads. the national farmers union say talk of a shortage is scaremongering — but we‘ve already seen prices go up a lot in the last year. we will be keeping a close eye on that in the coming months. thank you. you never know what the talking points are at wimbledon every year. this year flying ants have become at talking point. they gate—crashed the
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tournament and was followed by players as they stormed centre court. it wasn‘t only in as w 19 where we saw them. they have been seen where we saw them. they have been seen all around the country, including cambridge, widnes and worcester. a lot of people suddenly became instant experts on flying a nts became instant experts on flying ants but we‘ve got professor adam hart, who studies insects more generally. flying and day happens on different periods in different places. at different times and in different places flying ants will come out, it is tempting to say there is one day because that‘s not happening in your garden. it did happen on a specific day in wimbledon, but mostly it was one day. other specific conditions? yes, it is unusually early, normally it‘s the third week injuly. we had
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that lovely period of weather, they like and warm, they like no wind, they don‘t like any rain and when all those things come together they go. it‘s a bit indelicate to say so at this time of the morning but it‘s all about reproduction! normally do once you see on the pavement workers, concerned with making the colony big, not concerned with breeding. these are the little ones. flying ants seem much bigger. they are much bigger and they have wings. the males and females with wings mate and then the females will take another hole and they will try to start another colony. most will be eaten by seagulls but some are successful and away they go. did i read that the female statue of their own wings. yes, you can't make the whole when you‘ve got wings, they just have wings so they can get into the sky to mate with the males and then they come down. and caused some problems at wimbledon but there‘s nothing that you can do about it. it's
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nothing that you can do about it. it‘s a great spectacle, we don‘t get herds of wildebeest in this country but we do get flying ants, it is a great spectacle. we don‘t see them most of the time but they are in the soil, every eating the soil, top predators, very important and for a few days of the year they cause us bother, for most of the time we don‘t notice them. bother, for most of the time we don't notice them. is it a myth that they only come out for one day? don't notice them. is it a myth that they only come out for one day7m isa they only come out for one day7m is a myth. there is no flying ant day. you will see them in the coming weeks. it will be when it is one because these are the optimum conditions and this one together. they do but it doesn‘t mean that they can‘t come at the next day as well, we saw it at wimbledon. not quite as synchronous as we think but pretty impressive. and they have no interest in humans. man at all. we arejustan interest in humans. man at all. we are just an inconvenience for them, they don‘t like our windscreen
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wipers, but we are just a triviality of them, they just want to mate and get in the ground. today it‘s not going to be as hot, but still a very warm day across southern and eastern areas in particular. we‘ve got some sunshine here this morning, bit more cloud further north and west. 0ne here this morning, bit more cloud further north and west. one or two showers. the showers would be anything like those torrential showers we saw yesterday across eastern parts of england. those have cleared away and it should be a cleared away and it should be a clear day today, though cloudy. cloud across scotland with a few showers particularly in the north—east, but for western scotland there will be some sunny spells. a few breaks in cloud across northern ireland. temperatures typically 16 or 17 degrees. temperatures across wales and north—west england not as high as yesterday, 20 or 21 degrees. quite a bit of cloud but some breaks developing to give some sunny spells at times. the best sunshine will a lwa ys at times. the best sunshine will always be toward southern areas of england, particularly of the
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south—east, where the temperatures are 26, 20 south—east, where the temperatures are 26,20 7 degrees. through south—east, where the temperatures are 26, 20 7 degrees. through this evening into tonight, little change across southern evening into tonight, little change across southern areas. evening into tonight, little change across southern areas. we have this week called for moving south, bringing cloud and cooler conditions across northern areas. temperatures in the north drop into single figures in some areas. towards the south a fairly uncomfortable night for sleeping once again. into saturday patchy rain across southern parts, associated with that cold front, breaking up all the time. sunny spells developing across most places in the day. some sunny spells. not quite as warm as today. temperatures down 17—23. rain moving into scotland and northern ireland. 0n the whole, driver most of us. there will be some showers developing, some of those could be on the heavy side central areas. temperatures in the high teens to mid—205. this is business live from bbc news with rachel horne this is business live from bbc news with rachel home and ben bland.
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pressure grows on that t20 reach g20 to tackle the migration crisis, is more investment in africa the answer? that is our top story. —— pressure grows on the g20. the 620 the g20 begins today, but can leaders who represent 85% of the world‘s wealth come up with a plan to solve the growing migration crisis? also when the programme, forget the exploding phones, because samsung says it is on track for record quarterly profits. we live in our asia business hub with details. markets in europe have opened and they are all down, we‘ll be looking at the figures.
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